Category Archives: Voting

Public still supports voter ID laws

voteridThe American public supports requiring voters to bring a photo ID to the polls, despite complaints by civil rights groups and the U.S. Justice Department that such laws can be discriminatory. In a recent Rasmussen Reports nationwide survey, 74 percent of likely voters supported an ID requirement. Also, 61 percent of those surveyed did not think the ID requirement discriminates against some voters, and 61 percent said that voter fraud was a serious problem in American today. Fifty-six percent said that supporters of stricter voter registration laws were trying to stop people who are not eligible to vote from voting, but 33 percent said they were trying to keep eligible voters from voting.

Immigration shouldn’t be top issue of secretary of state race

kobachcandidKansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach is locked in a tight race with Democrat Jean Schodorf. Both candidates have 46 percent support in the latest SurveyUSA poll, sponsored by KSN, Channel 3. But where Kobach is succeeding is in making immigration a top issue of the campaign, even though it has little to nothing to do with the office. Of those surveyed, 37 percent said that immigration was the most important issue, followed by 21 percent who said voter registration. Among those concerned about immigration, Kobach leads Schodorf by 32 points.

Public should be able to see election office work

lehman,tabithaThough some voters said their polling sites had been changed without notification, and there were poll book mix-ups involving the husband and son of candidate Carolyn McGinn, Sedgwick County Election Commissioner Tabitha Lehman (in photo) is due some credit for avoiding a repeat last week of the problems of 2012. But why the sudden secrecy in her office? First Lehman and county officials denied news reporters the usual access to watch the counting of votes on Election Night. Then organizers of the marijuana petition drive complained that they weren’t allowed to watch as the signatures were counted. The election office is doing essential public business, not dealing with sensitive personnel or legal issues. Maintaining public trust requires that the public, which often means the media, be able to watch the office work whenever it wants, but especially as votes and petition signatures are counted.

Voter-impersonation fraud is nearly nonexistent

voteridThe purpose of voter ID requirements, such as the one in Kansas, to is prevent someone from showing up to vote and pretending to be someone else. But how often does that actually happen? Almost never. Justin Levitt of the Loyola Law School in Los Angeles documented every known allegation of voter-impersonation fraud nationwide since 2000. Out of more than 1 billion votes cast during that 14-year period, he found only 31 alleged cases of impersonation fraud. That’s less that 0.0000031 percent. What’s more, it’s unclear how many of the 31 cases were actual fraud; several may just be computer or data-entry mistakes. To stop this nonexistent problem, 34 states have passed voter ID laws, potentially disenfranchising thousands and thousands of voters.

Chamber, AFP failed to purge more moderates

middleroadThis time, the Kansas Chamber of Commerce and Americans for Prosperity-Kansas failed to purge state lawmakers who wouldn’t toe their line. The groups targeted about half a dozen lawmakers who didn’t support attempts to repeal the state’s renewable energy standards. All of the lawmakers won their primaries Tuesday. “I was No. 1 on their hit list,” Rep. Russ Jennings, R-Lakin, told the Kansas Health Institute News Service. “But I stood my ground for the people of my district, and they got it.” In the 2012 primaries, the Koch-backed groups were successful in defeating several GOP moderates. Jennings thinks voters may have “some buyers’ remorse about what happened two years ago.”

Election went more smoothly, but turnout disappointing

votingaug14It’s concerning that some Wichita voters showed up at the wrong polling places Tuesday and said they were never informed that their voting locations had changed. Sedgwick County Election Commissioner Tabitha Lehman must do a much better job of alerting people to poll changes before the November election – as she has pledged to do. But Tuesday’s election didn’t have the processing problems that delayed and distorted results during the 2012 elections. That’s a relief. What’s most disappointing about the election is the low turnout. Only 18.7 percent of registered voters in Sedgwick County voted in the primary, down from 25.6 percent in the 2010 primary. In one area House race, fewer than 400 people voted.

Candidate endorsements being released

Recall ElectionThe Eagle editorial board has begun releasing its endorsements for contested primaries. Thursday’s endorsements were for Kansas House races in Sedgwick County. Friday’s will be for Sedgwick County Commission and District Court. Saturday’s will be for Kansas governor, secretary of state and insurance commissioner. On Sunday we will endorse for U.S. Senate and U.S. House. The endorsements that really matter are by voters in the Aug. 5 primary.

When candidates don’t debate, voters lose

debateThe hot races of the unseasonably cool summer in Kansas have seen a scarcity of debates. That may serve candidates strategically but makes losers of the voters. Rep. Mike Pompeo, R-Wichita, and former Rep. Todd Tiahrt sparred at a Wichita Crime Commission forum and have agreed to debate on TV (6:30 p.m. Monday, KWCH, Channel 12) and radio (6 p.m. July 27, KNSS 1330-AM). Rep. Tim Huelskamp, R-Fowler, and challenger Alan LaPolice shared the stage at a Liberal event. Secretary of State Kris Kobach and GOP challenger Scott Morgan both spoke to Wichita Pachyderm Club members on Friday. But there have been too few public face-offs, and Sen. Pat Roberts, R-Kan., has declined to debate tea partier Milton Wolf. As the Kansas City Star’s Steve Kraske said in expressing disappointment in Roberts: “At election time, we expect our candidates to stand side by side with their opponents and address the day’s pressing issues. At least once, right?”

Secretary of state race also getting some notice

Scott Morgan, candidate for Kansas Secretary of State.  2014Kansas’ gubernatorial race is receiving a lot of national media attention, but the GOP primary in the secretary of state race also is starting to get some notice. Scott Morgan (in photo), who is challenging incumbent Kris Kobach, appeared this week on the “All In With Chris Hayes” show on MSNBC. Morgan, who served as a staff member to former Sens. Bob Dole and Nancy Kassebaum Baker, acknowledged that it will be difficult to win in a GOP primary, but he felt compelled to run. “At some point you have to stand up and say, ‘This isn’t us; we’re better than this.’” Morgan said that Kansans may not be flashy but we are decent. “We can be kind to each other,” he said, “and we don’t have to fan fear all the time.”

Glickman’s tips for democracy

congressinsessionIn Politico magazine, former Wichita congressman Dan Glickman and former Maine Sen. Olympia Snowe proposed “Ten Ways to Strengthen Democracy.” Among their ideas to “fix the electoral process, return Congress to legislating and enhance public service”: Increase primary participation with a single June primary date for congressional primaries and more open primaries. Let special commissions handle redistricting. Increase disclosure of political contributions, including those made to independent groups, and of spending by congressional leadership PACs. Reform the filibuster and Senate debate. Empower congressional committees. Adopt a biennial budget cycle. Synchronize House and Senate workweeks. And “the president and congressional leadership should hold regular monthly meetings.” Glickman and Snowe co-chair the Bipartisan Policy Center’s Commission on Political Reform.

Voters have until July 1 to switch parties

Recall ElectionLast week Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach reminded wannabe candidates for national, state, county and township offices that they must file by noon June 2 for the upcoming elections (though independent candidates have until noon Aug. 4 to file by petition). “Kansans who wish to serve their community by running for elective office need to be aware of this important deadline,” Kobach said in a statement. This year there’s another key date for Kansas voters – July 1, which is the newly accelerated deadline for changing party affiliation in advance of the Aug. 5 primary. In future election years, the party-switching cutoff will be even earlier, June 1. The deadline to register to vote is July 15 (don’t forget your proof of citizenship). Unaffiliated voters can still pick a party on primary day.

Roberts challenge showed problem with Kobach’s PAC

yardsign2Now that Milton Wolf, the tea party challenger to Sen. Pat Roberts, R-Kan., has failed to convince the State Objections Board to oust the three-term senator from the GOP primary ballot on residency grounds, it will be up to Republican voters to decide between the candidates on their merits. That’s appropriate, and voters can hope that the campaign can shift from mudslinging to issues and experience. But Monday’s proceeding before the board, whose three office-holding members all recused themselves after having endorsed Roberts, did offer a fresh demonstration of why it’s inappropriate for Secretary of State Kris Kobach, one of the board members, to maintain his Prairie Fire political action committee and otherwise aggressively engage in politicking. As state Rep. Tom Sawyer, D-Wichita, unsuccessfully argued during the recent session in offering a House amendment to nix Kobach’s PAC: “It’s very important elections are fair. The person who is the chief election officer of the state should not have a PAC.”

New voting rules hindering elections

voterid“The state just continues to add complexity and confusion to elections,” Douglas County Clerk Jamie Shew complained. He said that the number of rules added to elections over the past several years “is mind-boggling” and hinders elections, the Lawrence Journal-World reported. He also disagreed with Kansas Republican Party chairman Kelly Arnold that “the primary election belongs to the political party, not to the general public.” If that is true, Shew said, should the political parties run and pay for those elections? “It would save our county about $130,000 to not run the August election,” he said.

Pro-con on Kansas-Arizona voter-registration ruling

votingaug12In a big victory for election integrity, Arizona and Kansas – led by their secretaries of state, Ken Bennett and Kris Kobach – have obtained an order from a federal judge allowing them to enforce their proof-of-citizenship requirement for voter registration. In a decision issued on March 19, Judge Eric Melgren of the federal district court of Kansas found that the refusal of federal election authorities to add state-specific instructions to the federal voter-registration form notifying residents of Arizona and Kansas that they have to provide proof that they are U.S. citizens to complete their registration is “unlawful and in excess of its statutory authority.” This is a huge loss for the Obama administration, as well as liberal advocacy groups that apparently want to make it easy for noncitizens to illegally register and vote in our elections. There is no question that is happening – there have been numerous cases all over the country. This decision should provide momentum to other states seeking to pass a similar requirement. For anyone interested in ensuring the integrity of our election process, this was a commonsense decision. – Hans A. von Spakovsky, National Review

Republican lawmakers who work to impose higher bars to voting – either through proof-of-citizenship or voter ID laws – are well aware that many of those otherwise-eligible voters who struggle to come up with the required documents, which include a birth certificate, passport or driver’s license, are more likely to vote Democratic. In recent months, it seemed that judges were beginning to see through the pretense of such laws, whose proponents insist they are necessary to protect “election integrity” despite the lack of any significant evidence that voter fraud of any kind exists. Nevertheless, Judge Melgren accepted at face value the claim by Kansas and Arizona that only “concrete proof of citizenship” can allow them to determine whether a voter is eligible. Republican-controlled state legislatures could respond to their aging, shrinking voter base by appealing to a wider range of voters. Instead, they write off entire segments of the public and then try to keep them from the polls, under the guise of battling fraud and illegal immigration. The courts have more than enough evidence by now, and they should see this ruse for what it is. – New York Times

Let locals control timing of local elections

votingboothAt least a Kansas Senate committee decided against placing municipal and school board elections on the same ballot as state and federal elections. But in voting to move local elections from the spring to August and November of odd-numbered years, the Senate panel dismissed the wishes of local officials, who overwhelmingly oppose the change. Why is this the Legislature’s concern? What happened to local control?

GOP wants another barrier to voting

votingnoFirst Republicans in the Legislature passed a law making it harder for people to vote and to register to vote. Now they want to prohibit people from changing their party affiliations from June 1 through Sept. 1. As with their claims of voter fraud, there is no evidence that switching parties is a problem that requires legislative action. Not surprisingly, Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach backs the change. His likely Democratic challenger this year, former State Sen. Jean Schodorf of Wichita, opposes it. “Our state government should not use its power to limit an individual’s right to vote in an election because one party or another is losing voters, or because they don’t like the way citizens are voting,” she said. “That is not democracy.”

Secretaries of state shouldn’t be overtly partisan

kobachcandidKansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach was mentioned in a National Public Radio report on “a trend of overtly partisan figures running for a job designed to be neutral when it comes to election administration” – though he defended himself and other officeholders. “The secretaries range on the political spectrum and have policy differences, but I would vouch for every secretary of state to be able to have fair election results,” he said. But Art Sanders, a political science professor at Drake University, sees the politicization of the secretary of state office as “a very good symbol of how low our politics have sunk.”

So they said

kobachcandid“I think that’s actually an extraordinarily high percentage.” – Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach (in photo), telling a Senate panel that 72 percent of Kansans (52,000 people) who tried to register to vote last year met the proof-of-citizenship requirement and completed their registrations

“If we didn’t have the requirement it would be 100 percent.” – Senate Minority Leader Anthony Hensley, D-Topeka

“Happy Kansas Day! Celebrating 153 years of not being Missouri.” – U.S. Rep. Lynn Jenkins, R-Topeka, in a Wednesday tweet

“Uhh, stay classy @RepLynnJenkins I’m sorry you feel the need to dis my state to celebrate yours! #stoptheborderwar” – Tweeted reply from a Kansas City, Mo., teacher

GOP state convention gets even more conservative

gopvoteThe crowd at the state GOP convention in Wichita last weekend “was more conservative than it has been in decades,” observed Martin Hawver of Hawver’s Capitol Report. State Sen. Steve Fitzgerald, R-Leavenworth, announced that he is challenging U.S. Rep. Lynn Jenkins, R-Topeka, in the August GOP primary, claiming that Jenkins is too moderate. The biggest question of the convention was whether former U.S. Rep. Todd Tiahrt would announce a challenge to U.S. Rep. Mike Pompeo, R-Wichita. Tiahrt is still thinking it over, Hawver said. Meanwhile, GOP insiders are arguing about whether a small straw poll means anything. The poll taken at a Kansas Young Republicans business meeting resulted in a 17-17 tie between Sen. Pat Roberts, R-Kan., and challenger Milton Wolf.

Brownback has duty to defend voting rights

votingaug12It was disappointing but not surprising that Gov. Sam Brownback didn’t mention in his State of the State address last week the 20,000 Kansans who have had their voting rights suspended. Brownback has tried to back away from this issue, leaving it to Secretary of State Kris Kobach and the courts to resolve. On Friday, staff at the U.S. Election Assistance Commission rejected Kobach’s request to allow Kansas to go beyond federal rules and require proof of citizenship in order to register to vote. As governor – and as the person who signed the law that created this mess – Brownback has a duty to defend the voting rights of Kansas citizens.

Schmidt’s gun opinion confusing

gun3Is concealed-carry welcome at Kansas polling places? Well, it depends. According to an opinion issued Wednesday by Kansas Attorney General Derek Schmidt, whatever the rule in a building the rest of the year will prevail on Election Day, except in the unlikely event that a county rents an entire private building as a polling place. “The use of real property as a polling place does not transform the nature of that property for the purposes of the (Personal and Family Protection Act),” he wrote. But in answering Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach’s question that way, Schmidt likely has sowed confusion for voters and local election officials. It would be better if Kansas did as Texas and Florida have done, and specifically barred guns at polling places.

Two-tier voting scheme could be costly

votingLike Kansas, Arizona is pursuing a two-tiered voting scheme in which those who registered to vote following the federal rules (which don’t require proof of citizenship) would only be able to vote in federal races, not also in state and local elections. In addition to being confusing and unfair, such a scheme would increase costs. Election officials in Maricopa County, Arizona’s most populous, estimated that it would cost at least an additional $250,000, and probably more, to conduct two-tiered primary and general elections in 2014.

Kobach downplays suspended voters

Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach downplayed the more than 17,000 Kansans who have had their voter registrations placed in “suspense” because they didn’t provide proof of citizenship, suggesting that many of them are just procrastinating, the Lawrence Journal-World reported. “If a lot of people aren’t planning on voting until the next even-numbered (year) election … they may be thinking ‘what’s the hurry?’” Kobach said at a Rotary Club meeting in Lawrence. He also dismissed as out of date a 2006 national study that found that as many as 11 percent of U.S. adults don’t have a government-issued photo ID, and he downplayed the 532 ballots that were not counted in the 2012 general election because the voters did not bring photo ID to the polls. Yet Kobach portrays a handful of allegations of voter fraud during the past decade as an epidemic requiring extreme measures.

Schodorf criticizing proof-of-citizenship law she voted for

Jean Schodorf, the Wichita Republican turned Democrat who is challenging Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach, is making her signature issue the 17,000-plus voter registrations “in suspense” because of the law requiring proof of citizenship to register – and no wonder. It’s appalling that so many would-be voters are being blocked by the new document requirement, and that Kobach is so unconcerned about the problem. But Schodorf has a less-than-clear message to convey about the law, which she voted for as a state senator. “My constituents wanted it. I don’t like the bill. I voted for my constituents,” she told Associated Press. Another bit of confusing nuance, as noted by AP’s John Hanna: “Schodorf said she’d support efforts by legislators to repeal the law, but she also said that she’d work to make its administration go more smoothly.”

One area ballot uncounted due to voting law

Before local elections were held Oct. 8 on proposed funding projects, more than 100 voter registrations in Derby and nearly a dozen in Colwich were “in suspense” for lack of proof-of-citizenship documents, among more than 18,000 such registrations statewide. The individuals had been contacted multiple times, according to the Sedgwick County Election Commissioner’s Office. In the end, according to Deputy Election Commissioner Sandra Gritz, “there was only one provisional ballot due to lack of a citizenship document” in the area elections – meaning the would-be voter’s ballot didn’t count.