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Will Republicans aid Democrat in Senate race?

orman,greg“Paradoxically, Pat Roberts’ political future may depend on his Democratic opponent staying in the race. And that, in turn, affects the balance of power in the closely contested Senate,” an article in the New Yorker magazine noted. That’s because polling shows the Kansas Republican senator winning if the race is between him and Democrat Chad Taylor, or if the vote is split between him, Taylor and Independent Greg Orman (in photo). But if the race were only between Roberts and Orman, one poll had Orman ahead by 10 points. “With so much at stake, if the national Republicans were to take a purely Machiavellian perspective, they might find ways to help Taylor to stay in the race,” the article said. “This fall, Taylor may find himself some unexpected allies.”

Public still supports voter ID laws

voteridThe American public supports requiring voters to bring a photo ID to the polls, despite complaints by civil rights groups and the U.S. Justice Department that such laws can be discriminatory. In a recent Rasmussen Reports nationwide survey, 74 percent of likely voters supported an ID requirement. Also, 61 percent of those surveyed did not think the ID requirement discriminates against some voters, and 61 percent said that voter fraud was a serious problem in American today. Fifty-six percent said that supporters of stricter voter registration laws were trying to stop people who are not eligible to vote from voting, but 33 percent said they were trying to keep eligible voters from voting.

Follow other states’ lead on Medicaid expansion

Doctor Speaking with PatientPennsylvania became the ninth state led by a Republican governor to expand Medicaid. Its expansion, which was approved last week, will be contracted through the state’s privatized Medicaid program, similar to KanCare, and will provide health coverage to nearly 500,000 low-income adults. Counting Pennsylania, 27 states and the District of Columbia have now expanded Medicaid, and several other states are pursuing it, including Indiana. But in Kansas, Gov. Sam Brownback and the Legislature refuse to act. As a result, about 75,000 Kansans are left without health insurance and Kansas hospitals are stuck with unpaid bills. It’s a lose/lose.

Dubious, bogus and utterly phony headlines

SPOOFSLOGOThe following satirical headlines come from borowitzreport.com and theonion.com:

Koch Brothers Encouraging Youth To Make Voices Heard By Forming Super PAC

Nation Debates Extremely Complex Issue of Children Firing Military Weapons

Critics Blast Obama for Consuming Three Meals a Day While on Vacation

Teacher Asks Students To Split Into 2 Groups To Simulate Ideal Class Size

Elderly Lobbyist Always Droning On About How Little Legislation Cost In His Day

Devastated Family Struggling To Cope After Losing Everything On DVR

Brownback to blame for conflict with teachers

brownbackmugGov. Sam Brownback said last week that he regrets the adversarial relationship he has with teachers, the Hutchinson New reported. But whose fault is that? Besides cutting base state aid to schools – the operational money that pays teacher salaries – Brownback has seemed much more interested in advancing the agenda of libertarian groups than in aiding teachers. If he cares about his relationship with teachers, why didn’t he intervene last session when GOP lawmakers were stripping teachers of their state-mandated due-process rights? Why has he supported legislative efforts to weaken teacher unions? Why didn’t he get more input from teachers and school administrators before proposing education reforms? It’s no wonder the relationship is strained.

So they said

William Koch“David and I like off-color jokes, Freddie likes more sophisticated jokes…. Charles likes golf.” – Bill Koch (in photo) describing the four Koch brothers in an Associated Press interview

“We’ve had to change a lot of things in Kansas since I came in.” – Gov. Sam Brownback, in USA Today, on why the gubernatorial race appears to be so close

“It’s an odd thing, but I’ve noticed this. People don’t like paying taxes.” – Brownback again, speaking in Garden City

“He was butt naked!” – Topeka resident Natasha Shamblin, who was surprised to see a naked man walking along the street (which, it turns out, is legal in Kansas)

Public meeting was constructive, excellent first step

forumCity officials and all who participated in a “community intervention conversation” last Thursday should be congratulated. They dealt openly and honestly with a difficult subject, and did so in a constructive and proactive manner. The meeting was held in response to recent events in Ferguson, Mo., where unarmed black teen Michael Brown was shot by a white police officer. Much of the conversation focused on ways to improve policing and bolster community and police relations. One of the most concrete and positive outcomes was Wichita Mayor Carl Brewer’s commitment to try to find the money “to man-up every officer with a camera.” More discussions and reforms are needed, but the Thursday meeting was a excellent first step.

Review state standard on child abuse

When a Kansas policy is out of step with all other states, it merits further review – particularly when it involves child abuse. As an Eagle news article reported last Sunday, Kansas is the only state in the country that requires clear and convincing evidence of child abuse or neglect before someone can be put on a state registry that bans him or her from living, working or regularly volunteering in a state-regulated child-care facility – including foster homes. Other states have a lower burden of proof. Kansas raised its standard in 2004 to be more consistent with state law. But 10 years of being it place, it is a good time to review the law to see if the higher standard is still appropriate or if it is putting children at risk and should be lowered.

Anti-abortion groups criticize ‘After Tiller’ documentary

tillermovieAnti-abortion groups are upset about a documentary airing Monday at 9 p.m. on KPTS, Channel 8, and on other public broadcasting stations. “After Tiller” profiles the four doctors in the United States still openly performing late-term abortions after the the 2009 assassination of Wichita abortion doctor George Tiller. It also examines the reasons women seek late abortions. National Right to Life described the film as “an unabashed love story, so to speak, about the successors to a man who specialized in late, late abortions.” Judie Brown, president of American Life League, complained about tax dollars being used to broadcast a film that is “nothing short of pure propaganda intended to demonize the entire pro-life movement and drum up support for late-term abortion.”

Why was Kobach on delinquent tax list?

kobach2One of the things a candidate for public office never wants to see is his name on a list of delinquent taxpayers. But Secretary of State Kris Kobach had the embarrassment of having to explain why he was on the Douglas County list of delinquent property taxes that was published in the Lawrence Journal-World. Kobach lives in Wyandotte County but owns property in Douglas County. Kobach told the Journal-World that he challenged the valuation on the property but either didn’t receive or didn’t notice the revised valuation notice. Kobach paid the $614.32 tax bill on Aug. 13, the same day the delinquent tax list was published in the newspaper.

Immigration shouldn’t be top issue of secretary of state race

kobachcandidKansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach is locked in a tight race with Democrat Jean Schodorf. Both candidates have 46 percent support in the latest SurveyUSA poll, sponsored by KSN, Channel 3. But where Kobach is succeeding is in making immigration a top issue of the campaign, even though it has little to nothing to do with the office. Of those surveyed, 37 percent said that immigration was the most important issue, followed by 21 percent who said voter registration. Among those concerned about immigration, Kobach leads Schodorf by 32 points.

So the independent polls are inaccurate?

thumbsupdownGov. Sam Brownback’s campaign tried to dismiss a new SurveyUSA poll showing Brownback trailing Democrat Paul Davis by 8 points. “SurveyUSA has a history of inaccurate polling and this is more of the same,” the campaign said in a statement. Actually, SurveyUSA has been one of the more accurate polls in recent state elections. And what about the latest Rasmussen Reports poll, which is Republican leaning and showed Davis up by 10 points? Or the latest survey by Public Policy Polling, which had Davis up by 2 points? Meanwhile, the Brownback campaign released its own “internal poll” Tuesday showing Brownback leading by 1 point. Obviously, much could change between now and the November election, and Brownback and his allies will continue to try to paint Davis as a lackey of President Obama. But the SurveyUSA poll, which was sponsored by KSN, Channel 3, shows the hole Brownback is in right now: He trails Davis in every age, gender and racial category.

Kobach is ‘go-to’ guy on immigration lawsuits

kobach2Secretary of State Kris Kobach was profiled by Reuters news service as “the most prominent figure among a small group of lawyers working to punch legal holes in (President) Obama’s immigration policies.” The article noted that Kobach is challenging “Obama’s 2012 decision to grant temporary deportation relief and work permits to young people brought to the United States illegally as children by their parents” – though many legal experts don’t expect him to get far. If Obama announces new major immigration policy changes, as expected, Kobach likely will be part of a legal challenge. Meanwhile, Kobach was in Denver Monday arguing before an appeals court that voters who register using a federal form should have to provide proof-of-citizenship documents. His Democratic opponent in the November election, former state Sen. Jean Schodorf, is questioning how much time Kobach spends on immigration issues rather than on his taxpayer-funded job. On Wednesday she plans to release her personal income tax returns dating from 2011 and has called on Kobach to do the same.

Crack down on sexual assaults at colleges

Good for Wichita State University for hosting a free seminar Wednesday on preventing and responding to sexual assaults at schools and college campuses. ESPN’s “Outside the Lines” program reported that colleges – large and small, public and private – can be slow to act on assault allegations, if they act at all. The U.S. Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights recently added the University of Kansas to a list of 71 colleges under investigation for their handling of campus sexual assault. The WSU seminar is from 9 a.m. to noon at the Hughes Metropolitan Complex, Room 132, at 5015 E. 29th St. North.

Brownback has changed emphasis on K-12 spending

brownback54In a TV ad for his re-election campaign, Gov. Sam Brownback says, “We’re putting more money in public education.” That’s true. Total school funding in Kansas is more for fiscal 2015 than it was in fiscal 2011, when the governor took office. Brownback and others rightly point with pride to increased funding for teacher pensions and capital costs, and to some extra money and local property-tax relief ordered by the courts. But in Brownback’s first gubernatorial campaign and earlier in his term, he complained that too few dollars were making it into Kansas classrooms, even using a questionably low percentage to try to prove his point (in photo). His count-it-all view now seems at odds with his classroom emphasis back then. And as Mark Tallman of the Kansas Association of School Boards recently wrote, “when measured against changes in the cost of living, funding for educational programs that can actually be spent on teachers, administrators and student support programs has declined by $500 million since 2009.” That’s why hearing Brownback’s claims of “more money” for schools makes many of those who work in schools want to raise their hands in objection.

What’s new? Political ad cherry-picks claims

cherry-pickingA new political advertisement by the Republican Governors Association portrays Democratic gubernatorial candidate Paul Davis as being devoted to “tax-and-spend” ideas of President Obama. Though information in the ad is partly true, it “falls short because conclusions are based on cherry-picked snapshots that don’t fully explain his (Davis’) record,” the Topeka Capital-Journal reported. “At the same time, the commercial fails to point out actions by Davis that correlate to those of (Gov. Sam) Brownback.” For example, the ad criticizes Davis for voting for several policies and programs that Brownback also supports.

Bardo has transformed a campus before

bardoMany are surprised by how much and how quickly Wichita State University president John Bardo wants to change the institution, including by building an innovation campus. But an article in the fall issue of the Magazine of Western Carolina University, which Bardo served as chancellor from 1995 to 2011, describes how the millennium brought “the biggest building boom” in the history of the college in Cullowhee, N.C. “The list of major construction initiatives completed at WCU between 2000 and 2012, including new building, renovation and infrastructure projects, totals more than $327 million in improvements, along with the addition of more than 1.1 million square feet of new space.” Enrollment surged from nearly 6,700 in 2000 to more than 9,000 in 2007. One funding mechanism may not be replicable in Kansas, though: a $3.1 billion statewide bond package for higher education that North Carolina voters approved in 2000 and that “cleared the way for nearly $100 million in bond-funded construction projects on the WCU campus, including construction of the fine and performing arts center that has since been named in Bardo’s honor.”

DCF’s ‘good move’ not so good for downtown

finneybldgMany are still shaking their heads over the Kansas Department for Children and Families’ decision, expected for a year and finally confirmed last week, to exit the Finney State Office Building and move to 2601 S. Oliver in 2015. That will mean 550 fewer workers in a downtown that needs more. DCF will no longer be centrally located and accessible via multiple bus routes. The state will be paying $13 a square foot at the facility the U.S. Postal Service is vacating, instead of the $6 the city offered the Brownback administration to try to keep state agencies and their more than 700 employees in the Finney building. Yes, the place badly needs work, but the city had offered to do a $6 million renovation as well. Yet a DCF spokeswoman characterized this as an “all-around good move.”

New Kellogg/I-235 interchange is finally happening

kellogg,I-235Many Wichitans won’t believe it until they see it, but a new interchange at I-235 and Kellogg is on the horizon. The Kansas Department of Transportation announced last week that the interchange will be part of $1.2 billion in road and bridge improvement projects across the state over the next two years. Also on the list are $95 million in expansions to East Kellogg from Cypress to Wiedemann. Though the I-235 interchange isn’t quite as much of a death trap since the city added another lane to the bridges on Kellogg over the Big Ditch, the 1950s-era interchange is unsafe and outdated. KDOT plans to begin work in November 2015 and complete construction in 2017. That is provided the Legislature doesn’t raid the funding to cover state budget shortfalls.

So they said

robertsmug“With all due respect to Mr. Reid, I don’t think that James Madison’s wig fits on his head.” – Sen. Pat Roberts (in photo), R-Kan., in Paola, criticizing Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid’s planned Sept. 8 vote on a constitutional amendment to limit the money that can be donated to campaigns

“War on Women much?” – National Republican Senatorial Committee spokesman Brad Dayspring, to the Weekly Standard, referring to how Chad Taylor, the Democrat challenging Roberts, drew national attention in 2011 when he announced his Shawnee County District Attorney’s Office, after a budget cut, would no longer prosecute misdemeanors including some domestic violence cases

“And you thought dumping ice water on your head was cold.” – Rep. John Dingell, D-Mich., on GOP House members, including Rep. Lynn Jenkins, R-Topeka, who participated in an ALS fundraising challenge but voted to cut $1.5 billion from the 2011 budget of the National Institutes of Health, a portion of which went to ALS research

“I felt the helicopter hit something; later, someone said it was a rock. I thought the pilot would right it, but then I saw the ground come up…. Stuff fell on me; I didn’t know if they were people or things.” – New York Times foreign correspondent Alissa Rubin (formerly of The Eagle), describing the crash of a helicopter evacuating Yazidis in Kurdistan that left her with broken bones and a fractured skull

Need to start paying attention to Orman

orman,gregGreg Orman faces long odds as an independent candidate for U.S. Senate in Kansas. But a recent poll and noteworthy endorsement make the Olathe businessman someone to watch. A survey released last week by Public Policy Polling showed Sen. Pat Roberts, R-Kan., leading the race with 32 percent support, followed by Democrat Chad Taylor at 25 percent, Orman at 23 percent and Libertarian Randall Batson at 3 percent. But if the race were just between Orman and Roberts, Orman would be leading 43 to 33 percent, according to the survey. (Roberts leads Taylor 43 to 39 percent in a head-to-head matchup.) Orman also was endorsed last week by Jim Sherow, the Democratic candidate in the 1st Congressional District. Sherow said that Orman “presents the best chance at providing Kansas new energy in the U.S. Senate.” A big challenge Orman faces – in addition to the fact that it’s a four-way race, not a two-way one – is that he has only 36 percent name recognition, according to the survey. But among those who have an opinion about him, he is seen favorably by Democrats, Republicans and independents.

Moran hopeful GOP can end gridlock in Senate

morannew

Update: An earlier version of this post incorrectly stated Moran’s position on term limits.

Sen. Jerry Moran, R-Kan., said he is serving as chairman of the National Republican Senatorial Committee because he wants to end the gridlock in the U.S. Senate, not because he loves politics, the Lawrence Journal-World reported. “If the Republicans get the majority and we can’t function, then I don’t know what the next step is,” Moran said at a candid town hall meeting in Baldwin City this week. Departing from the GOP rhetoric that unrealistically vows to repeal the Affordable Care Act, Moran spoke of possible changes to the law that President Obama might support – such as increasing the work threshold for when employers must provide health insurance from 30 hours a week to 40 hours. He also said he supports term limits but could make a case pro and con. “Many in Kansas see our glory days in the Senate as those of Bob Dole and Nancy Kassebaum, and both were in the Senate a long time,” he said.

Recovery from Ebola is cause for celebration

brantly,writebolMany Wichitans took a personal interest in Kent Brantly and Nancy Writebol, the American medical missionaries who were infected by the Ebola virus, as Writebol’s son Jeremy is a pastor in Wichita. So it was a relief and cause for celebration when both missionaries were released from Emory University Hospital this week, virus free. In a moving press conference at the hospital Thursday, Brantly thanked God, those who had cared for him in Liberia and at Emory, and all those who had prayed for him and Writebol. He also urged people to continue to pray for Liberia and for the people of West Africa and to “encourage those in positions of leadership and influence to do everything possible to bring this Ebola outbreak to an end.” Though Brantly and Writebol recovered, many others won’t.

Schmidt defends outside legal expenses

schmidtKansas Attorney General Derek Schmidt defended the more than $8 million that his office has spent on outside legal counsel. “We’ve managed the available resources very effectively,” Schmidt told the Topeka Capital-Journal. Schmidt’s Democratic opponent, A.J. Kotich, has criticized the spending and said that, if elected, he would have staff attorneys handle more of such work. He also said he would not defend state laws and actions that he determined to be unconstitutional. Schmidt said he would continue to defer to the legislative and executive branches. “I operate as the state’s lawyer,” he said. The outside legal expenses include $1.4 million so far on the school-finance lawsuit and $1.1 million defending anti-abortion laws.