Daily Archives: Sept. 26, 2013

Schodorf a welcome addition to secretary of state race

It’s not surprising that candidates already are lining up to challenge Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach in next year’s election. Kobach has spent much of his time in office trying to scare people about nearly nonexistent voter fraud in order to push through restrictions on voting – that is, when he isn’t flying around the country promoting anti-immigration legislation. Former Wichita school board president and state Sen. Jean Schodorf announced Wednesday that she is running in the Democratic primary. Randy Rolston of Mission Hills also is running. Schodorf noted the more than 17,000 Kansans so far who have had their voting rights placed in “suspense” by Kobach’s new rules. “That’s voter suppression,” she said. It’s particularly galling when the U.S. Supreme Court already has ruled that it is unconstitutional to require proof of citizenship in order to register to vote.

Obamacare no longer a political debate, Sebelius says

Though House Republicans and Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, clearly think otherwise, Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius contends that the Affordable Care Act is no longer a political debate. “It’s what we call the law,” she said at a conference last weekend in Kansas City, Mo. “It was passed by the United States Congress. It was signed into law by the president in March of 2010. It was upheld by the Supreme Court in July of 2012. The president was re-elected. It’s the law.”

Hensley’s conspiracy theory about Stegall is lame

Senate Minority Leader Anthony Hensley, D-Topeka, has sound reasons for objecting to the new method of selecting judges for the Kansas Court of Appeals, which threatens the quality, nonpartisanship and independence of the court. But Hensley is off base in seeing a conspiracy in the four-month delay in swearing in Caleb Stegall, whose nomination was confirmed by the Kansas Senate early this month. If Hensley were right about the timing being designed by Gov. Sam Brownback to spare Stegall a November 2014 retention vote, that would mean court officials including Chief Justice Lawton Nuss, as well as Brownback’s office, have lied about the delay being necessary for budgetary and remodeling reasons. Plus, 53 years of judicial-retention elections for members of Kansas’ appellate courts suggest Stegall need not worry about being thrown off the bench by voters, whenever his name first appears on the ballot.