Monthly Archives: November 2012

Wichita weather: Warm and windy

It’ll be a warm and windy day in the Wichita area today, forecasters say.

Highs could reach the mid-60s under partly cloudy skies, with south winds gusting to nearly 25 miles an hour. Skies should remain mostly clear overnight, when lows drop to the low 40s.

The winds are expected to ease Friday, when more sunshine and highs in the 60s are predicted.

The weekend won’t feel much like December, forecasters say, with highs in the upper 60s under sunny skies.

For more information on current conditions, go to our weather page.

Wichita weather: A pleasant day ahead

Today should feel pretty pleasant compared to the past few days in the Wichita area.

Highs should climb into the low 60s, forecasters say, with sunny skies and modest south winds occasionally reaching the teens. Skies should remain clear tonight, when lows drop to the upper 30s.

Thursday is expected to a bit windier, forecasters say, with south-southwest winds gusting to nearly 20 miles an hour. Highs will again be in the low 60s under mostly sunny skies. Lows will bottom out in the upper 40s, with winds easing during the overnight hours.

Friday and the weekend should be sunny, forecasters say, with highs in the 60s and perhaps even 70 on Sunday.

For more information on current conditions, go to our weather page.

A cold night in Wichita

The temperature dropped to 16 early this morning in Wichita.

That’s the coldest it’s been in the city since February 12, according to the National Weather Service. But it’s not the start of an extended cold snap – warmer weather is expected the rest of the week.

Wichita weather: Another chilly day, then a warming trend arrives

Temperatures may touch 50 in the Wichita area today, forecasters say, but gusty south winds will keep the day brisk.

Those winds could reach 20 miles an hour at times under sunny skies. Lows tonight are expected to drop into the mid-20s before temperatures rebound to the upper 50s on Wednesday.

Skies should be mostly sunny Wednesday, forecasters say, with light south winds occasionally climbing into the teens.

For more information on current conditions, go to our weather page.

A new way to measure wind speeds?

I was annoyed by what I thought was a leaf blower outside. It’s the wind!

Amy Palmer’s tweet from windy, snowy Kansas City earlier today made me chuckle.

Then it made me think: why don’t we use descriptive terms or phrases for the wind more often? We have “hail the size of golf balls,” for example.

But how often do we hear the wind speed/strength relayed in ways we quickly grasp? What’s a gale-force wind sound like, for those who haven’t experienced them? What does a 15-mile-an-hour breeze sound like?

Oh, we’ve all heard the cliche about tornadoes sounding like freight trains – the irony being that, for all the tornadoes I’ve been close enough to hear, not one of them made me think of a freight train. Jet engines? Yes. A flowing river? Yes, especially if the tornado is moving over a wheat field or pasture. A freight train? Nope.

I’ve heard wind whisper, whistle, whine, howl.

But what terms or phrases do you use? Let me know at sfinger@wichitaeagle.com, and I’ll share them in another blog post.

Wichita weather: A raw November day

After a remarkably warm Thanksgiving weekend, residents of Wichita and the surrounding area will get a brisk reminder that it really is late November today.

Highs aren’t expect to climb out of the mid-40s in the Wichita area, forecasters say, with blustery north-northeast winds gusting to nearly 30 miles an hour. Skies will be mostly cloudy today, then gradually clear overnight as lows fall into the mid-20s. Winds will ease as well, dropping into the low single numbers.

Tuesday won’t be much warmer, forecasters say, but the winds will be lighter. Highs will inch into the upper 40s, with southerly winds staying in the single digits under mostly sunny skies.

A warming trend appears likely for the rest of the week, forecasters say, with highs climbing into the 60s for the weekend.

For more information on current conditions, go to our weather page.

Wichita weather: Record warmth?

The high temperature record for November 21 in Wichita is under assault today, with forecasters projecting highs in the low 70s.

The record is 73, set just two years ago. Skies will be mostly sunny, with south winds gusting to nearly 30 miles an hour. Overnight lows will drop only to the low to mid-50s, forecasters say, with gusty south winds topping 20 miles an hour as clouds begin to move into the area.

Thanksgiving Day brings with it a slight chance of showers, along with highs flirting with 70. South winds will remain robust, gusting to nearly 25 miles an hour.

Much cooler temperatures arrive overnight, forecasters say, with lows skidding into the mid-30s as skies clear. Shoppers hoping to get an early start on Black Friday specials better bundle up. It’ll be sunny on Friday, forecasters say, but highs will only be in the low 50s.

For more information on current conditions, go to our weather page.

Wichita weather: Patchy fog early, then sunny and warm

Commuters may deal with patchy fog early Tuesday morning in the Wichita area, forecasters say.

The fog should lift by mid-morning, making way for sunny skies and highs in the upper 60s. Winds will stir out of the north, but remain light and then become variable by afternoon.

Overnight lows are projected to dip to the low 40s under mostly clear skies. Wednesday could see record highs in the mid-70s, forecasters say. Temperatures will be boosted by gusty south winds nearing 30 miles an hour.

Overnight lows will only fall into the low 50s, with south winds easing to the low teens. Thanksgiving is shaping up to be cloudy, with a slight chance of showers and highs in the upper 60s.

For more information on current conditions, go to our weather page.

Wichita weather: Sunny and warm

Wichita will enjoy a toasty lead-up to the Thanksgiving holiday period, with highs several degrees above normal for the latter half of November.

Highs today will be in the upper 60s under mostly sunny skies, forecasters say. Winds will be light and out of the south.

Overnight lows will slip into the low 40s, with skies remaining mostly clear. Winds will gradually ease until conditions become calm, forecasters say.

Tuesday is expected to be a second helping of Monday, with sunny skies, light winds and highs in the upper 60s.

Lows Tuesday night will again drop into the low 40s, with a few clouds and light and variable winds.

Wednesday is projected to bring more sunshine and highs in the 70s.

For more information on current conditions, go to our weather page.

National Weather Service terminates Sandy assessment effort

The National Weather Service has abruptly shelved the independent assessment of the agency’s performance during Hurricane Sandy.

Mike Smith, a senior vice president at Accuweather Enterprise Solutions in Wichita, who served as co-chair of the assessment panel, reported the move on his blog Thursday.

“In an email at 9:46 this morning, Douglas Young of the National Weather Service wrote the SA team members:

I am writing to inform you that effective immediately we are terminating the spin-up of the National Weather Service Sandy Service Assessment Team.”

The panel held its first conference call on Tuesday, Smith said.

“We had decided who was going where, we were going over documents,” he said. “We were getting work done.”

Smith, who had written in his blog earlier this month that the weather service’s system of internal assessments following major weather events was “broken,” posed questions on his blog Thursday that had arisen in the early stages of the panel’s work.

Was there a decision not to call Sandy a “hurricane” regardless of its meteorological characteristics? If this decision was made, was it made Friday (October 26th) or Saturday morning? If so, who made the decision and why?
Was this decision the reason hurricane warnings, in spite of a large and dangerous hurricane moving toward the coast, were never issued?
Given that an obvious large and powerful hurricane was headed for the U.S. coast, why wasn’t that decision reconsidered? For example, Barry Myers, the CEO of AccuWeather, urged (on the AccuWeather.com website) the immediate issuance of hurricane warnings about eight hours before landfall. Others also urged the lack of hurricane warnings to be reconsidered.

Considering the numerous deaths and the substantial amount of damage, Smith wrote, the Sandy asssessment “may have been the most important the National Weather Service has ever conducted.”

Rob White, president of WeatherGuidance, LLC, a private weather forecast and storm warning firm located near Austin, Texas, shared in his weather blog an e-mail sent by NWS spokeswoman Susan Buchanan.

No timetable for the launch of a possible “broader federal assessment” has been given.