When raccoons invade

Don’t complain the next time you’re dealing with a nuisance mouse or two in our garage. It could be much, much worse.

One of the 27 raccoons live-trapped from a garage in a nice neighborhood east of Great Bend within the past few months.

Since mid-summer my friends Andy and Erin Fanter have been dealing with raccoons invading their garage east of Great Bend.

To date, they’ve live-trapped 27 raccoons from inside their garage.

Oh, and they’re getting into the garage with the main garage doors closed, by entering through a pet door. And the Fanters live in a very nice house, in a clean neighborhood. Food in the bowls left in the garage for the cats are what’s drawing the ‘coons.

In their about six years in the place, the Fanters have seen few raccoons in the past. Even mid-winter corn piles put out for deer and pheasants didn’t attract a lot of ‘coons.

Andy figures the severe drought may have displaced a lot of raccoons living at Cheyenne Bottoms, which is only a few miles away.

Even for such a brazen species, the Fanters have been amazed how bold the raccoons have been the past several weeks. When spooked, many have simply waddled to beneath the nearest vehicle. Once, when all the live-traps were filled with trapped ‘coons, the Fanters opened a pet crate, put in a little cat food and a few minutes later walked back out into their garage and simply shut the crate’s door on a raccoon that had crawled into the crate.

The trapped raccoons have been moved and released on private property, with the landowner’s permission, more than 10 miles away.