Bad news and good news at Cheney Lake

I’m normally pretty happy when I catch something while fishing.

Thursday morning, though, I caught about 60-somethings at once and was pretty dejected.

About 60 zebral mussels were attached to this rock about the size of a golf ball. It was about 10 feet below the lake's surface and a half-mile or more from shore.

About 60 zebral mussels were attached to this rock about the size of a golf ball. It was about 10 feet below the lake's surface and a half-mile or more from shore.

Mark Fowler and I were trolling for wipers and walleye when the crankbait I was watching started pulling a little heavy.

One of the lure’s hooks was tucked into a rock the size of a golf ball. On that rock were about 60 zebra mussels ranging from the size of a fingernail to mere specks.

And as I looked I realized half of the rock had been settled down into the mud and that half  held none.

Also that each of those mussels daily sucked about a quart’s worth of plankton from Cheney’s productivity…and that was one small rock with maybe four inches of surface amid a lake that held dozens of miles of rocks, logs, boats and other hard surfaces that could hold zebes.

I’m telling ya, this invasive species problem isn’t far from getting way out of hand. I fear for the wild Kansas my descendents will be able to enjoy.

On a brighter side we caught our combined  limits of four 21-22-inch wipers Thursday morning. Friday morning Eagle editor Sherry Chisenhall joined us and the fishing was even better.

At one time I had a nice wiper on one line while Sherry had two – one on both lures on her line – at the same time.

We had our combined limit of six wipers in less than two hours, thanks to Mark’s skills.

Unfortunately we had zebra mussels snagged on our hooks for much of the morning.