Never easy raising twins

It’s emotionally demanding trying to ride herd on young twins for any kind of mother. This photo taken on one of our food plots at our farm shows it can be physically challenging, too.

With most of her physical energy going to  producing milk for young fawns,this doe is looking very thin. She also appears to be dealing with lots of ticks.

With most of her physical energy going to producing milk for young fawns,this doe is looking very thin. She also appears to be dealing with lots of ticks.

You can easily see her ribs and pelvic bones because most of what she eats goes to producing milk.

Checking the photo on a larger screen shows lots of ticks and some large areas of hair loss, too.

The fawns, however, are shiny and fat.

So it usually goes in the world of white-tailed deer. Probably 75-percent of the Kansas does have twins another 10-percent or so have triplets.

Keep in mind this doe’s standing amid a lush clover field. There’s also plenty of natural browse in the area, too. It was a hard winter but a lush spring. Heat and humidity have been very high the past two weeks.

But this doe’s fortunes will probably change in coming weeks as the fawns become more dependant on vegetation. She’ll also give them enough kicks and head-bangs to stop their efforts to nurse.

And within about six weeks acorns and other mast will begin to fall and provide even more food. The does will have about two months to fatten-up before they’re bred again. After that winter is only about a month away.

From then on much of what a doe eats goes into the fawns developing within.