Junior achievement of the wiggly kind

Much of Sunday was a tense time for people in the region. Heavy rains had many creeks and rivers brim-full or flooding.

In Newton many basements were taking water and the staff at Sand Creek Station found about half of the noted golf course under as much as four feet of water. All through the area  people kept worrisome eyes on dark clouds to the west and fretted a forecast of more to come through the night.

And while out photographing the most water I’ve seen in Sand Creek in my 17 years in the area I came across a pair of entrepreneurs making the best of it.

No, Shealee and James Rine weren’t stumping sump-pumps or sandbags. They were our filling a bucket full of some of the biggest nightcrawlers I’ve ever seen.

James Rine, left, and his sister, Shealee, spent part of Sunday morning gathering nightcrawlers washed ashore by high waters. Some were more than a foot-long. They sold the worms to relatives to use for fish bait.

James Rine, left, and his sister, Shealee, spent part of Sunday morning gathering nightcrawlers washed ashore by high waters. Some were more than a foot-long. They sold the worms to relatives to use for fish bait.

Seriously, some of the worms stretched 12-inches or more.

The kids and family were picking the worms from the banks of Sand Creek near Fifth Street.

High waters from the creek and water rushing down the street had piled the nightcrawlers. They were sold to relatives who will use them as great bait for catfish.