Trail cameras capture local nature in action

We sleep through the night and mindlessly spend our days at work.

But nature goes on.

A few days of a trail camera on a tiny patch of Harvey County is easy proof. Animals came and went to feed. Often on each other. This shot of the Cooper’s hawk and the crow is proof.

While I was at working in Wichita this Cooper's hawk was working in Harvey County. He grabbed this crow in-flight.

While I was at working in Wichita this Cooper's hawk was working in Harvey County. He grabbed this crow in-flight.

I’d walked part of this property a few miles east of Newton and hadn’t seen much wildlife Sunday morning.

I didn’t see many signs of wildlife, either, like droppings, tracks or where whitetail bucks were rubbing trees with their antlers.

But a couple of buckets of corn and a remote camera placed where two game trails met was a great way to do a wildlife census in a hurry.

Though the property showed very little sign of deer, a trail camera found five different bucks using the area.

Though the property showed very little sign of deer, a trail camera found five different bucks using the area.

I was surprised when I checked the camera four days later and found images of five different bucks and a nice assortment of does.

I’d expected to find raccoons raiding the bait pile. Instead I found crows.

First it was three or four, then one shot showed about 15. A minute later a photo was taken of a Cooper’s hawk snatching one of the crows from mid-air. Pretty cool, especially for the hawk.

And to think, it’s going on every second of every day in all parts of Kansas. Nature goes on despite our being largely oblivious to it.