Kansas State will value possession time against Baylor, but is possession time an important statistic in today’s game?

Earlier this week, Kansas State center B.J. Finney was asked about Baylor’s jaw-dropping offense. As an offensive lineman, he has spent most of his time leading up to Saturday’s game against the Bears studying their defense, but he had an answer prepared anyway.

“Time of possession,”Finney said. “The way you halt that is keeping that offense off the field. That is a big gameplan, as it always is, for us, to control the clock and control the tempo. We can’t let that slip away from us.”

Finney’s response wasn’t surprising. K-State coach Bill Snyder loves to win the time-of-possession statistic. When the Wildcats run the ball effectively and control the clock, he likes their chances.

But it’s worth pointing out that Baylor ranks 110th nationally in possession time, holding the ball for an average of 27 minutes, 12 seconds a game. It loses the possession battle weekly, yet wins games so easily that starters come out in the third quarter. The Bears are averaging 70.5 points and 779.5 yards.
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Sunday Rewind: Okla. State 33, K-State 29

Kansas State lost another close game at Oklahoma State on Saturday. The Wildcats committed penalties left and right and turned the ball far too often. In the end, they couldn’t overcome those mistakes and lost 33-29.

There will be some soul-searching after this one. The Wildcats feel like they let one slip away, which they couldn’t afford to do after losing to North Dakota State and Texas. Next up is Baylor, a team that appears unstoppable on offense. It will be interesting to see how K-State moves on from another agonizing loss and prepares for the toughest opponent of the season.

And with that, here is a look at all that and more in this week’s Sunday Rewind:
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Fiesta Bowl Countdown: Kyle Klein impressing coaches during bowl practices

Throughout his time at Kansas State, Kyle Klein has been known best as Collin’s younger brother.

That may always be the case, but Klein will be able to make a name for himself starting next year. Older brother will be gone, pursuing a career in the NFL. Klein will be a sophomore receiver, pursuing a starting spot.

With only Chris Harper and Zach McFall leaving the program, he will face strong competition. But he will be in the mix for playing time behind Tyler Lockett and Tramaine Thompson along with Curry Sexton, Torell Miller, and Deante Burton.

Klein saw playing time this season, but didn’t receive many targets. He didn’t catch a single pass.

At the least, that will change next season. Klein was still adjusting to the position this season. Since joining the K-State program, he has spent time at defensive end, tight end and receiver. He played practically every position, including quarterback, for his high school football team and prides himself on being versatile. Still, he needed time to fully grasp K-State’s offense as a receiver.

Now that he feels more comfortable, his coaches are expecting big things.

“He is having a great bowl prep,” co-offensive coordinator Dana Dimel said. “He is really starting to make some strides. I’m paying a lot of attention to what the young guys are doing. Kyle has made a lot of nice plays. He’s just like Collin. He is learning how to play his position. He is getting a lot better. He brings length to that position. We want to throw the ball downfield and he allows us to do that.”
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