You don’t say

“I usually like to start by asking if there are FBI officials in the house. Probably not, but they’re probably listening.”

Matt Cecil, director of the Elliott School of Communication at Wichita State University, talking at Rotary Monday about his book “Hoover’s FBI and the Fourth Estate: The Campaign to Control the Press and the Bureau’s Image

You don’t say

“I knew it! This totally explains why each year, starting in November and ending sometime in March, schools from all over the country try to stay as far away from me as possible—they’re just scared.”

Wichita State University mascot WuShock in an e-mail about the New York Post putting him No. 1 on a list of “The 12 creepiest mascots you’ve ever seen”

You don’t say

“The good news is they didn’t take out my funny bone.”

WSU spokesman Joe Kleinsasser’s comment while telling a co-worker about his recent surgery for a kidney stone

“That’s because they couldn’t find one.”

– Co-worker Bryan Masters’ retort to Kleinsasser

Karla Burns remembers Maya Angelou

WICHITA — With the Wednesday death of Maya Angelou, 86, Wichita’s Karla Burns remembered the poet for the simple yet significant way she affected her.

Angelou was a guest professor at Wichita State University when, in March of 1974, Burns was involved in a reader’s theater of Angelou’s “I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings.”

“I played her grandmother,” says Burns, who went on to become an educator and performer.

“She came over to me,” Burns says of when the production ended. “She talked to all of us.”

Angelou shared small bottles of Chanel with everyone.

Most important, though, was a comment Angelou made to Burns.

“She said, ‘You made me smell my grandmother’s kitchen,’ and I’ve never forgotten that in all my life,” Burns says. “It really shaped my feelings about theater … about being a woman and her as a poet. How poetic to have such a colorful comment made about your work.”

Burns says Angelou influenced her as an educator as well.

“She was such an inspiration,” Burns says. “She really moved my heart.”

PR News offends Kansas PRSA chapter two months after causing uproar

UPDATED — The Kansas Chapter of the Public Relations Society of America recently issued an invitation to Diane Schwartz, senior vice president and group publisher for PR News.

That’s the group that, during an e-mail appeal for more subscribers, told PR executives nationally that they can “score big” in the industry if they “Don’t be like Wichita State.” The e-mail came shortly after the ShockersNCAA tournament loss.

After much uproar in local PR circles — and with Shocker and WSU fans all over — a day later Schwartz apologized to the school.

PRSA president-elect Mary Beth Chambers says she invited Schwartz to “talk about lessons learned and best practices.”

On or about April 8, Chambers says she extended an invitation via e-mail.

“I think I gave it about a week or so before I followed up with a phone call and left a message.”

She says Schwartz didn’t return the call or e-mail.

“I said we weren’t going to tar and feather her,” Chambers says. “Maybe she didn’t believe me.”

Schwartz did return a call from The Eagle.

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You don’t say

“If you’re on TV, put it on your anchor desk so everyone can see it.”

Matt Cecil, director of WSU’s Elliott School of Communication, on the alumni mugs he gave to seniors at the school’s awards banquet Monday night

You don’t say

“Of course you can. This is your building.”

Lou Heldman’s response when Tom Devlin asked if he could make a couple of statements before the start of a WSU entrepreneurship forum at Devlin Hall Tuesday

‘Wichita’ is Tampa Bay Rays code word

WICHITA — In a Fox Sports story online Thursday, Tampa Bay Rays manager Joe Maddon is quoted as saying, “I never served time in Omaha, but I have in Wichita.”

Though that may not sound like a good thing, Maddon apparently meant well, and Wichita gets a great plug in the story.

Much like Peyton Manning used the word “Omaha” to signal certain plays in football, the article says Maddon is now using “Wichita” as a “code word to signal that a call should be challenged as part of Major League Baseball’s expanded replay.”

Joe Maddon, right, is using Wichita as his code name for MLB replay challenges.

Joe Maddon, right, is using Wichita as his code name for MLB replay challenges.

“Omaha and Wichita, kind of almost in a perverse way, rhyme,” Maddon said.

The article says the Wichita code is “a tip of the cap to his past.”

Maddon was involved in the National Baseball Congress World Series, which is held in Wichita, as a player and a coach and has been inducted into its Hall of Fame.

The article says baseball has a “soft spot throughout Wichita’s history,” in part due to the NBC. It quotes a few Wichitans about the code connection.

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Hallelujah, even SNL loves the Shockers

WICHITA — Wichita and Wichita State University have taken a bit of gentle razzing since the Shockers’ NCAA tournament loss.

There was Jimmy Fallon, who teased that the Shockers said they were able to focus on winning because, “We play in Wichita. Not many distractions here.”

Stephen Colbert joked, “March Madness comes in like a lion, and goes out like a lion who lost 10 grand betting on Wichita State.”

The city and the team have been shown a lot of love, too, especially in a funny Saturday Night Live skit over the weekend.

Actor Jay Pharoah reprised his role impersonating animated ESPN commentator Stephen A. Smith.

“When this whole thing started, I picked Wichita State to win it all, and I’m still picking Wichita State,” Pharoah, as Smith, stated.

“Now a lot of experts will tell you that Wichita State was eliminated from the tournament but that their season is over.”

With each word, Pharoah then sounded more like a preacher.

“But I have a feeling, and mark my words, that Wichita State will come back to win the entire NCAA tournament and an NBA championship. Mark it down. Hallelujah!”

Charlie’s PizzaTaco owners test cellphone battery chargers at each table

batterytwoWICHITA — The Shockers’ season may be over, but an incident that happened during one of the games has inspired an invention that is in the test phase and soon will go national.

A few weeks ago, Charlie’s PizzaTaco co-owner Tim Holmes says he observed a dilemma a customer was having in his restaurant near Central and Tyler.

“One day there was a young man watching the Wichita State game, and he was obviously fighting with his girlfriend via text message.”

Holmes says the customer’s phone was about to die, but he didn’t want to leave the restaurant. Nor did he want to further upset his girlfriend.

“He was kind of torn,” Holmes says. “So he asked me, ‘Do you have a charger that I could borrow?’”

Holmes thought it would a great idea to have a charger at every table so no customer ever has to choose between lingering over a meal and leaving in order to charge a phone.

His partner, David Hoffman, happens to own a company that manufactures cellphone batteries and sells accessories for phones to retailers nationally.

“We do about everything for a phone,” he says of Celltronix, which is part of Hoffco Brands in Golden, Colo.

Hoffman says his company is building a prototype and has some temporary devices at Charlie’s.

“I said, ‘Just put these out there, and get a reaction for me,’” Hoffman says.

“Basically what we’re doing right now is just testing the theory out,” Holmes says.

He says the device is a simple battery pack, which makes it portable.

“You don’t have to rewire your entire restaurant to do this project,” Holmes says.

There are three plugs in one charger for iPhones and Droids. The devices are attached to napkin holders.

The prototype batteries will be enclosed to prevent theft.

“Since I put them in, people just use the heck out of ’em,” Holmes says.

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