Bob’s Place to reopen in the Market Centre, sans founding barber Bob Shanks

WICHITA — Cosmetologist Tracy Carrington and barber Steven Dreiling are carrying on a Wichita tradition by reopening Bob’s Place.

“I was OK with retiring, but if Tracy wants to use the name, she’s perfectly welcome to it,” says Bob Shanks, who was a barber for more than 50 years in three buildings within four blocks of downtown.

The new shop is opening next month in the Market Centre at the southwest corner of First and Market.

Carrington began working with Shanks in 2009 and Dreiling started in 2012.

“We just wanted to … bring it back,” Carrington says of the Bob’s Place name.

“He’s just a huge mentor to me,” she says of Shanks.

“He was just a huge, huge part of my life. This is really … mostly to show my respect and love for him as a mentor.”

Shanks came from a family of barbers and stylists.

“The whole family has been in the hair business for about 250 years total time,” he says.

Unlike the rest of his family, Shanks says, “I didn’t want to work in the suburbs. I wanted to work in the business area.”

He says for years, he cut the hair of “CEOs of major companies and the presidents of major banks and heads of law firms.”

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Case, Moses & Zimmerman partners go separate ways; Moses & Pate LLC forms

WICHITA — Last month, Medical Development Management announced it will be moving into the 6,500-square-foot space that Case, Moses & Zimmerman occupies at the Garvey Center, and the law firm’s partners said they were exploring alternatives.

“Sometimes firms split up because there’s animosity,” Moses says. “That’s not the case here.”

Here’s what they’ve decided: Attorneys David Moses and Chris Pate are forming Moses & Pate LLC. Attorney Linda Priest, who is currently with Case, Moses & Zimmerman, is joining them in the approximately 2,300 square feet MDM currently occupies next door.

Bankruptcy attorney Bill Zimmerman is moving to Eron Law, a firm that has an emphasis in bankruptcy.

“It’s a perfect fit for Bill,” Moses says. “He’ll be continuing to provide his bankruptcy specialty.”

Attorney Mike Case, who has had the firm’s Kansas City office, will be of counsel with Moses & Pate as he transitions to retirement.

“He’ll be working towards retirement,” Moses says.

Attorney Susan Saidian is retiring as of April 11.

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You don’t say

Garvey Center employ Steven Shaffer changes the number atop the building one more time for the Shockers.

Garvey Center employ Steven Shaffer changes the number atop the building one more time for the Shockers.

“The streak is over, but they’re still No. 1 with us!”

Larry Weber on changing the sign atop the Garvey Center to say #1 with a heart instead of counting Shocker wins

Garvey Center goes to great heights to show Shocker support

34WICHITA — Maintenance workers at the Garvey Center had to come in on their days off this weekend, but it wasn’t because of a maintenance problem.

It’s because Larry Weber, vice president with Builders Inc., had the idea to paint the number of Shocker wins on the top of the 26-story building along with changing the downtown building’s lights to appear Shocker yellow.

“I thought what better way to show … appreciation than to light up the building and put the numbers on top,” Weber says.

First was “32” on Friday.

“When they were up there painting, people were honking horns and flashing lights,” Weber says.

Then came “33” on Saturday and “34” on Sunday.

yellowThe building’s lights were changed to yellow with the help of some theatrical gel. Weber says his maintenance crew has a theatrical background.

He says thanks to social media, people from as far away as Australia have commented on the display.

“So it’s getting some worldwide play, but then it’s a world-class team, right?”

Weber says he “of course” will continue to have the numbers repainted to reflect each win. He won’t say what he’s going to do after the final number is up.

“That’s going to be a surprise.”

Two state agencies sign at Garvey Center

UPDATED — The state has completed two more leases for agencies that will be leaving the Finney State Office Building.

The Kansas Department of Health & Environment and the Kansas Human Rights Commission will be moving to the Garvey Center.

“We were just really impressed with the spaces we visited,” says Todd Fertig, a spokesman for the Department of Administration. “They fit a lot better with what these specific agencies needed.”

In June, Have You Heard? reported that nine state agencies, including more than 700 employees, will leave the Finney building when the state’s lease expires on Sept. 30.

KDHE will take the entire seventh floor of the R.H. Garvey Building at 300 W. Douglas. That’s 10,566 square feet.

The Human Rights Commission is taking 1,800 square feet on the second floor.

Fertig says the commission is a smaller agency with a limited budget.

“The Garvey Center was able to really work with them to … kind of retrofit the space so it was really what they needed at a very affordable rate.”

Larry Weber, who handled the deal for Builders Inc., says he’s “excited to have them here and remaining in downtown.”

Both spaces are areas that Harrington Health has been in or been using for storage, Weber says.

All but a couple of the agencies that either are in or have been in the Finney building have made or are close to making deals for new space.

The largest of those agencies and the one to spur the move, the Department for Children and Families, is close to finalizing a deal at 2601 S. Oliver where the U.S. Postal Service has had a remote encoding center.

Workforce Alliance of South Central Kansas to move to New Leaf Plaza

UPDATED — The Workforce Alliance of South Central Kansas is turning over a New Leaf, so to speak, and moving to the shopping center of the same name at 21st and Amidon.

“It is very accessible and very visible for the public,” says Keith Lawing, president and CEO of the agency that connects workers with employers.

“I really think it’s going to be a perfect location for their new home, although some would have liked for it to stay downtown, I suppose,” says City Council member Jeff Longwell.

“They are at least for a little bit going to keep some of the administration stuff down in the Garvey building,” he says.

The Workforce Alliance had been at the former Commerce Bank building at First and Main downtown and had to scramble to find new space along with other tenants there when building issues, such as a broken elevator and suspended gas service, forced them to go elsewhere.

A site a few blocks down from First and Washington is where the Workforce Alliance temporarily is until the new space is ready.

Lawing says parking had become an issue where the Workforce Alliance was at First and Main.

“We definitely looked downtown,” he says seeking new space. “If we could have found a place that would have been adjacent to a parking garage … it would have been great.”

He says no such place could be found.

Longwell says that initially the Workforce Alliance will take about 26,000 square feet at New Leaf, which is on the southwest corner of the intersection and is home to a Walmart Neighborhood Market.

He says it “is going to be a really nice space.”

“It’s a good location, easily accessible, on a bus route,” Longwell says. “I really like that whole area. It’s kind of coming back a little bit.”

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Robert’s Shoe Shine Services moving to Garvey Center

Robert Cook shines Joye Teeters man at the Garvey Center.WICHITA — Except for airports, it’s rare to see many shoe shine men these days.

“There are so many people who don’t even know where to get a shine at today,” says Robert Cook, who has Robert’s Shoe Shine Services. “It’s a dying art.”

Cook is transitioning his business from a couple of Joe’s Seat Cover & Carwash stores to the kiva lobby at the Garvey Center. He won’t be there on a full-time basis for another couple of weeks.

Former Garvey Center shoe shine man Richard Henry died almost a year ago. Cook says another couple of shoe shine men in the area have died as well.

“It seemed like it created a void, so I’m here to fill that.”

Cook worked in a number of other jobs before deciding to enter the shoe shine business eight years ago after he was laid off from Safelite AutoGlass.

“Getting laid off just didn’t fit me too well,” Cook says. “I decided I didn’t want to get mixed up in that anymore. … I just thought it would be better to be independent.”

He says the Garvey Center makes sense for a number of reasons.

“I just think that that area is growing.”

Also, he says, “The spirit over there just seems to be appropriate.”

Cook says he’ll be located near Sheer Voltage Salon.

“We’re going to kind of have each other’s back,” Cook says of the women who own and work at the salon.

Cook hopes females will be a key part of his business.

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Squid Ink Creative and Computer Training Systems expand at Garvey Center

WICHITA — Squid Ink Creative is expanding at the Garvey Center at 200 W. Douglas.

“We’re growing,” says Brad Painchaud, director of business development. “We’re looking at room for growth in the next couple of years.”

The company, which is a full-service advertising agency, has 4,000 square feet and is expanding to almost 6,000 square feet.

“We’ve been making a bigger push to go after some new clients,” Painchaud says. “We’ve been successful with a few.”

Squid Ink owners Mark Karlin and Frank Lichtlin also own CTS, or Computer Training Systems, and have it in the same space. Painchaud says there may be some growth with CTS as well, but the main growth is with Squid Ink.

Currently, the agency has an open-concept office, but Painchaud says there’s a need for more private areas.

“We’re just trying to create some better meeting spaces.”

The agency is looking to make some hires as well.

Painchaud says there was no question about staying in the Garvey Center, where the agency has been for more than a decade.

“It’s centrally located for pretty much everyone.”

He says manager Larry Weber is helpful.

“Larry’s been great,” Painchaud says. “You know, the Garvey Center’s been good to us.”

You don’t say

“I guess it has rained a lot when the sides of your building start falling off.”

– The Garvey Center’s Larry Weber, commenting on storm damage from wind at the east-side Sears building

You don’t say

“I jokingly tell people it takes a staff of 3 over four weeks to plant and pull up the bulbs and it only takes 15 minutes to give them all away.”

— An e-mail from the Garvey Center’s Larry Weber on the center’s “Great Annual Tulip Give Away” of more than 15,000 tulip bulbs to tenants