Mayflower Clinic to move to Sutton Place

WICHITA — Two years after opening, the Mayflower Clinic is getting a home of its own in downtown’s Sutton Place and is expanding its services as a result.

The free medical clinic, which India native and Wichita attorney Abdul Arif and some friends founded to give back to the community, has been open on weekends at Douglas and Rutan where neurosurgeon Eustaquio Abay II has an office.

Abay and his wife, orthodontist Emeline Abay, donated the space. Arif says they’ve been exceedingly generous, but he wanted the clinic to be able to expand what it offers.

“We were looking to move so we can offer more services … on weekdays.”

The clinic saw more than 1,000 people in 2012.

“We had to do what we had to do in the beginning to get started,” Arif says. “The old model was the slapped-together-so-we-can-get-started model.”

The clinic will locate in 1,400 square feet at 209 E. William. Arif says there’s room to expand as well.

“Absolutely. That was the whole idea.”

Physicians will continue to donate their time for medical care on the weekends.

“The reason for our success is we’re open weekends,” Arif says.

He says many people can’t afford to take time off from work during the week.

“We try really hard to focus on the working uninsured.”

The clinic now will be open seven days a week and will offer mental health services during the week.

“We’re starting this big pitch to offer mental health services,” Arif says.

He says there’s a need for Spanish-speaking counselors and for counselors who can help patients who can’t afford the care.

“There’s a massive demand we found.”

Arif says it’s a timely decision with the school shootings in Newtown, Conn.

“With these god-awful shootings … there’s such a renewed emphasis on mental health,” he says.

“We chugged along for two years, and now it’s time (to) move on up … and do more bigger and better things because the demand is so huge.”

Eustaquio Abay II files a lawsuit against Abay Neuroscience Center, the practice he founded and named for his parents

Eustaquio Abay II in a 2008 file photo.

UPDATED — Physician Eustaquio Abay II has filed a lawsuit against Abay Neuroscience Center, the practice he founded in 1986 and renamed in 1996 in honor of his parents.

“Dr. Abay built the practice, but the other members forced him out by reducing his compensation wrongfully,” says Abay’s attorney, Jay Fowler of Foulston Siefkin.

“The practical effect is the other physicians made a lot more money, and Dr. Abay made next to nothing.”

Abay, who filed his lawsuit in Sedgwick County District Court last week, left the practice to start a new one in June.

“We did not force him out of the practice,” says Jeff Spahn, a Martin Pringle attorney representing the remaining partners at Abay Neuroscience Center.

“That was his decision to leave the practice.”

Spahn says Abay was paid what he was owed.

“I don’t know what Jay’s definition of nothing is, but he was paid a significant amount of money, and Jay knows better than that,” Spahn says. “At least I would regard it as a significant amount of money.”

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