Category Archives: Real estate

Panda Express to open at Derby Marketplace

WICHITA — Panda Express is going to open a third Wichita-area restaurant, this time in Derby.

The fast casual concept will go in the Derby Marketplace at Meadowlark and Rock Road. Panda will be in 2,350 square feet on the opposite end of the building where Starbucks is.

There’s another 3,200 square feet left to lease in the building.

The California-based Panda entered the Wichita market in 2010 with stores on Maize Road in front of Academy Sports & Outdoors and at One Kellogg Place on East Kellogg.

Leisa Lowry of J.P. Weigand & Sons represents the chain in the Wichita area.

Panda is similar to Chipotle in that diners walk through a line and first select a starch — steamed or fried rice or chow mein — and vegetables followed by two to three entrees.

Entrees consist of traditional Chinese dishes such as kung pao chicken, sweet-and-sour pork and beef and broccoli.

Look for more details on the Derby Panda as they become available.

Riordan Clinic plans affiliate clinics among other changes

brianWICHITA — After a three-year period of diminished involvement with the Riordan Clinic, CEO Brian Riordan is back.

“A lot of people are … leaving traditional medicine and moving over to what we do,” Riordan says. “That kind of excited me to the possibilities.”

That’s leading to some changes at the clinic, which Riordan’s late father, Hugh, founded in 1975.

“In those 39 years, it’s been more or less the same type of operation,” Riordan says.

That’s meant one campus at 3100 N. Hillside.

“We feel it’s our obligation to our legacy to kind of step up our presence a bit – or quite a bit,” Riordan says.

He’ll do that through affiliate clinics, the first of which will open by Sept. 1 at 1010 E. 17th St. in Hays.

“That will be our first non Wichita location,” Riordan says. “We can imagine a time when there’s … more than 100.”

The immediate goal is four affiliates by next year and 20 within four years. Riordan Clinic, which once was known as the Center for the Improvement of Human Functioning International, has 40 employees. Riordan anticipates needing 80 by 2018.

The clinic is known for its high-dose vitamin C treatments. Riordan says those types of treatments have “immense potential” and are getting more notice in the media.

“We kind of arrived in terms of acceptance,” Riordan says. “Our way of thinking and our treatment modalities have gone from fringe to mainstream.”

The first step the clinic takes with patients, or “co-learners” as Riordan calls them, is to test their blood “to understand where they might be deficient or have too much of something, and we try to balance those things first.”

“We try to understand each person’s biochemical individuality.”

Riordan says the clinic is still learning about vitamin C treatments.

“We’re kind of tuning it for each different malady.”

For instance, he says cancer treatments work better with doses given every other day while treatments for bacteria and viruses work better every day.

Riordan says the clinic has three missions: research, education and co-learning, or the treatment of patients. He says the research and education will remain in Wichita.

“We’ll be growing that over time,” he says.

“Affiliates will be able to help us to be able to see more patients,” Riordan says. “We think it’s incumbent upon us to be able to offer that at a wider base.”

He says he plans to tackle another longtime mission of the clinic, and that’s to give people seeking treatment a place to stay.

“We’d like to start putting one or two up per year,” Riordan says of small living spaces.

He hopes to accommodate 20 temporary residents by 2018.

Riordan also is exploring the idea of vitamin C manufacturing on the clinic’s 92 acres, only about 15 of which are currently in use.

“Sometimes it’s very easy to get, sometimes it’s very difficult to get,” he says of vitamin C.

Riordan says the clinic may use some acreage to produce non-corn-related organic vitamin C.

Part of the clinic’s acreage is a nature preserve that will remain.

Part of it is farmed by a local farmer, and Riordan says the clinic is talking with the Land Institute in Salina for help with it.

Since Riordan’s April return, the clinic began offering nutritional supplements, which it calls nutrients. There are 18 branded products so far.

Other smaller changes are coming to the clinic as well. Its first solar panel will be installed in September for alternative energy.

“Our electric bill’s way, way higher than we’d like it to be,” Riordan says. He says he wants it cut in half by 2018.

Also, he’s working with Gallery XII to increase art on the campus.

“I’m trying to make our (campus) more beautiful and help with the healing process through art,” he says.

Riordan doesn’t see a full-service restaurant returning to the campus because he thinks it’s too remote to attract enough regular diners.

“Down the road, we would like to have the organic garden supply a juicing corner.”

Also, Riordan says one day there could be some light, grab-and-go type of food.

The Riordan Clinic is going through a lot of changes at once, but Riordan doesn’t think it’s too much.

“It’s very realistic.”

He says there’s “a talented staff and a supportive board” to make it happen.

“What we have to offer is synching all of a sudden with what society wants. I personally don’t think it’s too much. It’s what we have to provide.”

Woof Gang Bakery & Grooming to open at Cambridge Market at 21st and Webb

WICHITA — If you heard rumblings of a Wolfgang bringing some tasty treats to a new pink-and-brown, chandelier-lit bakery and boutique on the east side, it wouldn’t be surprising if you wondered whether international chef and restaurateur Wolfgang Puck might be bringing one of his concepts here.

Turns out, it’s Woof Gang Bakery & Grooming that will be opening in Cambridge Market at 21st and Webb.

“It’ll definitely be probably the most unique pet store that people in this market have seen,” says Lisa Chamberlain, who is opening the business with her husband, Albert Cipo.

“Most people are like, ‘This is for dogs?’ ”

The two had another Woof Gang franchise in Houston but wanted to move back home to Wichita.

The business is a combination store, bakery and grooming site.

Chamberlain says she plans to have grooming for dogs and cats.

“Hopefully, if I can find a groomer who does cats,” she says. “That’s an if.”

Chamberlain says she tries to do kennel-free grooming in a short amount of time to keep down an animal’s stress level.

“Our grooming is more of a spa-type setting,” she says.

That includes “pawdicures” and blueberry facials with natural products.

“The dogs love it,” Chamberlain says. “It’s like lick, lick, lick.”

Woof Gang also will have an all-natural bakery for special-occasion cakes and treats.

“It is a bakery for pets,” Chamberlain says. “We have all sorts of treats.”

She says Woof Gang also will sell holistic food, including dry and wet food and raw and freeze-dried food.

There also will be chews, bowls, beds, collars and leashes.

“We’re a little more of a boutique feel,” Chamberlain says.

The 2,000-square-foot store will open in October.

Don Piros of Landmark Commercial Real Estate handled the deal.

“Ideally, we’d like to do more than one,” Chamberlain says.

The plan is to open a second Woof Gang on the west side within a year after the first one opens. Then the Kansas City area is a possibility, she says.

“It’s a long-term plan.”

Ganesh Yoga Studio to move to Delano

WICHITA — Christince Vumai is branching out on her own and moving her Ganesh Yoga Studio from the Nurture Wellness Center in College Hill to new space in Delano.

“I was starting small to kind of get a feel of it,” Vumai says of opening within Nurture Wellness Center in April.

She’s now in the process of moving to 1201 W. Douglas, which is just off the southwest corner of Douglas and Seneca across from QuikTrip.

The space is just over 700 square feet.

“I don’t want anything huge,” Vumai says.

“I want to keep classes small and intimate,” she says. “I want it to be very accessible and not intimidating.”

Vumai, who offers standard yoga for all levels, plans to reopen Aug. 2.

She says she named her business after the Hindu god Ganesh. Vumai says she especially likes his elephant symbolism.

“The elephant symbolism is very welcoming and nonintimidating.”

MOXI Junction set to open thanks to Kickstarter campaign

UPDATED — Kickstarter did just what Joanna Kilgore needed it to do. The campaign raised more than $22,000 to help put in a kitchen for MOXI Junction, a new coffeehouse coming to Maize.

“It was awesome,” Kilgore says.

The house at Park and Academy that is now home to MOXI Junction.

The house at Park and Academy that is now home to MOXI Junction.

It worked so well, she says, “Oh, we’re opening Monday.”

In October, Have You Heard? reported that Kilgore and some Maize-area friends, including two other mothers of special-needs children, are opening the business as a place for their kids to work. The coffeehouse also will have a bakery and art gallery.

MOXI, which stands for Mothers of Exceptional Individuals, will be at the northwest corner of Park and Academy in Maize.

Kilgore had said she was close to opening when she learned she wouldn’t have all the money she needed from the farm bank she was working with.

She credits Facebook and an e-mail campaign for helping reach the Kickstarter goal. She says her “uber goal” was to raise $60,000, but the $22,000 and some change was enough to get going.

Kilgore says she already had her kitchen on order.

“I had to do this little bridge thing using my retirement account,” she says. “It wasn’t pretty. That’s not what you want to do.”

The kitchen is now in thanks to what Kilgore calls a determined group of people “working sunup to sundown.”

Initially, MOXI will be open from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. on weekdays. After school starts, it will be 6 a.m. to 5 p.m. on weekdays. Eventually, Kilgore hopes to add Saturday service.

 

Pink Saloon to move to Waterfront addition

UPDATED — After a period of some hard consideration, Brooke Hebert has decided to move her Pink Saloon from Douglas and Oliver to the new addition of the Waterfront at the northwest corner of 13th and Webb.

“It’s been really good where we’re at, so it wasn’t an easy decision,” she says.

Pink Saloon, a women’s clothing shop, had been in El Dorado for three years before moving to Wichita five years ago to the same center where Aspen Boutique is.

Hebert says her business has grown every year she’s been in Wichita, but she says the majority of her clients are in east Wichita.

“They come from all over,” Hebert says, but “the east side’s really strong for us.”

waterfrontThe new Whole Foods Market, which is set to open at the Waterfront on Sept. 10, is part of the lure.

“Whole Foods, obviously, is a great anchor,” Hebert says.

She says she also likes other tenants at the Waterfront, which includes a more developed addition on the northeast corner.

On the northwest corner, the 51,000-square-foot first phase is nearing completion.

In the Bag Cleaners last week announced it will have a store there, and Equity Bank also will be to the north of the building that will be home to the cleaners, Pink Saloon and Whole Foods. There are spaces for several other tenants as well, and there’s another 14,000-square-foot building coming with the second phase of development. It will be between the bank and the first retail center. There also will be a smaller building in front of the second center with up to 4,000 square feet.

“We are getting ready to start Phase 2,” says the Waterfront’s Stephen Clark II.

He says Pink Saloon will make a great addition.

“You’re starting to see now how visible this center is, and I think that location will make a big difference for her,” Clark says.

Hebert says her store will have a new look.

“It’s going to be completely different, actually, as far as the aesthetic,” she says.

“The space is going to be really cool,” Clark says.

Hebert won’t share details yet, though.

“It’s going to be a surprise.”

She says the new store will be ready sometime in the fourth quarter.

At 1,800 square feet, Hebert says, her store will be smaller than her current 2,800 square feet, but “it’s not going to change our product mix.” She says she may even expand some lines.

Hebert says she’s excited about the move.

“Anytime you change and evolve, it’s just really exciting.”

Don Piros of Landmark Commercial Real Estate and Carl Hebert of InSite Real Estate Group handled the deal.

Carl Hebert is Brooke Hebert’s brother-in-law. This was the first time the two worked together.

“He really helped me through this process,” Brooke Hebert says. “It was really fun to work with him.”

Law Kingdon Architecture designed the center, and the Law Co. is the contractor.

“We’re about where we’d thought we would be,” Clark says of the center’s progress. “Things are going well.”

He says there should be more news soon.

“We’ve got some great tenants that have signed up and that we’re talking to.”

Sunbelt Rentals enters market with store

WICHITA — Sunbelt Rentals, an international company that bills itself as the second-largest rental company nationally, is entering the Wichita market.

“We’ve got a variety of products that we’ll be able to provide,” says district manager Keith Dressendorfer.

He says Sunbelt, which is based in England and has U.S. headquarters in South Carolina, already has customers here. Now they’ll have a store to shop at in addition to online.

Sunbelt is remodeling a 13,000-square-foot building at 3410 W. 30th St. South. Dressendorfer says it should be ready by late September, but the company will have a soft opening sometime in August.

There are more than 400 Sunbelt stores, many of which surround the Midwest.

“Basically there’s been a void in the Midwest,” Dressendorfer says. “We just want to start filling in some of the Midwest.”

The company now has stores in Oklahoma City, Joplin, Mo., Rogers, Ark., and Kansas City. A second Kansas City store is in the works.

“A year ago, none of those existed for us,” Dressendorfer says. He says there’s “quite a lot of growth up in this area for us.”

Sunbelt does “a little bit of everything,” Dressendorfer says.

There are a dozen divisions, such as a general tool group, a concrete and masonry group, an earth moving division, an oil and gas division, a climate control division and a scaffolding division.

Dressendorfer says customers could be anyone from a homeowner needing to rent something for a one-time use to a Fortune 500 company needing to rent a number of things.

“We will do business with pretty much anybody,” he says.

General and commercial contractors are some of Sunbelt’s most regular customers.

Dressendorfer says there is a budget for nine employees initially, “But who knows where it will go after that?”

He says Sunbelt plans to hire locally.

Dressendorfer says a second Wichita store or more throughout Kansas are possibilities.

“There will always be that opportunity.”

Augusta Municipal Airport manager hopes to have restaurant at airport

WICHITA — Augusta Municipal Airport manager Lloyd Partin’s latest hope for the airport is a restaurant.

“Most people fly with some sort of intention in their trip,” he says. “It gives people a reason to fly, especially for leisure reasons.”

Partin says the idea would be to lure people flying in for the proverbial $100 hamburger but also attract people driving in from around the area.

He says it’s about giving “another reason why the airport is important.”

Partin says the car rentals that the airport added are used more by nonfliers than those flying in.

There’s a hurdle to a restaurant, though.

“The primary issue right now is having access to a sewer line,” Partin says. “That’s the critical component.”

He says a microsewage treatment plant is a possibility, as is getting a line extended from Andover.

“We were discussing the possibility with the city of Andover,” Partin says. “We’re still working on that and still having discussions with them.”

Ideally, Partin would like a restaurant that serves breakfast, lunch and dinner.

“That would be my goal,” he says. Having a full-service menu “would be a real benefit.”

“It would be a good location for something like that.”

Partin says he’s spoken with potential operators but doesn’t have anything waiting on the back burner. He says there’s interest, though.

“I think a restaurant, from the airports that have one, is kind of like icing on the cake,” he says. “It brings it full circle in terms of providing a reason for people to get out and fly.”

MakeICT will remain in Delano for now

WICHITA — When Bluebird Arthouse closed in late May, MakeICT had to scramble a bit to make sure it would still have a place to operate.

The group had been subleasing space at Bluebird, which was on West Douglas just east of Seneca in Delano.

Now, with help from the Knight Foundation Fund of the Wichita Community Foundation, MakeICT has a new lease at the address along with money to help pay for it and utilities for six months.

MakeICT formed in 2012 as part of the international Makerspace movement and recently was granted a nonprofit status.

“It’s this very cool thing that sometimes I think I’m too old to understand, but I’m trying,” says Shelly Prichard, president and CEO of the Wichita Community Foundation.

“It’s very loosely defined,” she says, “… which is part of what my personality has trouble with.”

Makerspaces are types of community centers that also have tools to help with all kinds of creativity.

That could be a wood shop, machine shop, art studio or science lab. Currently, MakeICt members can share a 3D printer, a foam cutting machine, PCs, CNC machines and other equipment and tools.

“It’s mostly about creation, whatever that looks like,” Prichard says. It’s things that aren’t necessarily connected … except by the idea of creation and community.”

Though she teases that she may be too old for it, Prichard says MakeICT actually is for people of all ages, backgrounds and interests.

“It’s not just a technology focus. It’s also the idea of community and coming together.”

Prichard says the idea of people with common interests coming together in a community to make things might be something people see on TV, “but it’s here in Wichita, and it’s happening.”

Along with help for rent and utilities, MakeICt also received money for new equipment and will have help for future planning and development.

“The part I’m excited about is the creation of a business plan,” Prichard says, “… just for sustainability so that they can grow and figure out a way to continue having this impact.”

She says the idea is for a business model to support the nonprofit idea.

Prichard says the goal is to get MakeICT a little closer to downtown, but she’s not sure where it may wind up after its lease in Delano expires.

“Hopefully that’s what the business plan will determine.”

2 Attics Antique Mall and Estate Liquidation Services to downsize

WICHITA — In 2011, Kirby Melugin told Have You Heard? he was expanding his 2 Attics Antique Mall and Estate Liquidation Services to make more room for vendors.

Now, he’s downsizing his space near 61st and Hydraulic in Park City to give himself a little bit of breathing room.

“When it’s just me, it’s just kind of hard to take care of everything,” he says.

In addition to having the store, Melugin says he’s been doing a lot of on-site estate sales.

He says he’s decided to keep the 5,000 square feet he added in 2011 because it’s a little larger than the space he originally opened.

“The main thing is, we’re not closing. We’re just downsizing.”

After Labor Day, Melugin is going to start closing the store on Mondays and Tuesdays. Now, he’s open seven days a week.

“I need a day off,” he says.

“I’m going to work smarter, let’s just put it that way.”