Category Archives: Lincoln Heights Village

Uncommon Market to open in Lincoln Heights Village on March 1

UPDATED — Renee Rhodes and Jodie Hinds have been selling new and vintage home decor at various shows in Kansas and Oklahoma for more than a year with an intent to one day open a permanent shop. They’ve wanted to be in Lincoln Heights Village at Douglas and Oliver, and a space finally opened.

“That was kind of my indication it was time to open a store,” Rhodes says. “When we saw the sign, we said, ‘Well, this is it,’ and jumped in.”

Uncommon Market will open March 1 in the former Angela Snow Photography space. Snow moved her business to the former Artifacts space at the center.

Rhodes says the Uncommon name “says a lot about the things that we carry.”

“It’s just kind of an uncommon mix of things,” she says. “All of those things that kind of make you feel good.”

That includes pillows, frames, furniture and bath and body products. The store also will accept some furniture consignment pieces, and Rhodes will sell some repurposed pieces of her own.

“It’s not major overhaul but just kind of a facelift,” she says of what she does.

This is in addition to her full-time job as a risk control specialist with IMA. Hinds also has a full-time job with Hawker Beechcraft.

Read More »

You don’t say

“The sexy part just gets their attention.”

Susan McKnight of Susan’s floral shop in Lincoln Heights Village, which she’s named the sexiest retail center in the city because it offers one-stop shopping for Valentine’s Day gifts

Gessler Drug Co. to relocate from Normandie Center to Lincoln Heights Village area

gessleraugWICHITA — Gessler Drug Co. is heading home.

So says Hal Schwarz, who is relocating the store from Normandie Center at Central and Woodlawn to where AAA Kansas used to be next to Il Vicino near Douglas and Oliver.

That’s one corner over from where Gessler first opened in Wichita in 1938. Watermark Books & Cafe is there today.

Schwarz says Gessler was one of the original anchor tenants in what became Lincoln Heights Village in 1949.

When he recently was looking for new space, Schwarz says the 4,300-square-foot location he found “just stood out far and above anything else we had seen.”

Read More »