Category Archives: Garvey Center

Case, Moses & Zimmerman partners go separate ways; Moses & Pate LLC forms

WICHITA — Last month, Medical Development Management announced it will be moving into the 6,500-square-foot space that Case, Moses & Zimmerman occupies at the Garvey Center, and the law firm’s partners said they were exploring alternatives.

“Sometimes firms split up because there’s animosity,” Moses says. “That’s not the case here.”

Here’s what they’ve decided: Attorneys David Moses and Chris Pate are forming Moses & Pate LLC. Attorney Linda Priest, who is currently with Case, Moses & Zimmerman, is joining them in the approximately 2,300 square feet MDM currently occupies next door.

Bankruptcy attorney Bill Zimmerman is moving to Eron Law, a firm that has an emphasis in bankruptcy.

“It’s a perfect fit for Bill,” Moses says. “He’ll be continuing to provide his bankruptcy specialty.”

Attorney Mike Case, who has had the firm’s Kansas City office, will be of counsel with Moses & Pate as he transitions to retirement.

“He’ll be working towards retirement,” Moses says.

Attorney Susan Saidian is retiring as of April 11.

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Medical Development Management to expand at the Garvey Center

UPDATED — For the second time in less than a year, Medical Development Management is moving. It’ll be a much shorter trip this time around, though.

In July, the company moved from Kellogg and Rock Road to about 2,500 square feet at the O.W. Garvey Building at 200 W. Douglas.

MDM had an option to take some extra space for a total of 4,500 square feet. Instead, though, it’s now going to move next door into the 6,500 square feet that Case, Moses & Zimmerman currently occupies.

“It made more sense to do that,” says MDM president Joe Hlavacek.

“We were willing to work with them in allowing them to continue to grow,” says attorney David Moses. “It also affords us an opportunity to look at all of our alternatives.”

Hlavacek says there are several ways the company is growing.

“Right now … the project that’s causing us to need more space is we … are in the process of developing a general acute care hospital in Kearney, Nebraska,” he says.

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Two state agencies sign at Garvey Center

UPDATED — The state has completed two more leases for agencies that will be leaving the Finney State Office Building.

The Kansas Department of Health & Environment and the Kansas Human Rights Commission will be moving to the Garvey Center.

“We were just really impressed with the spaces we visited,” says Todd Fertig, a spokesman for the Department of Administration. “They fit a lot better with what these specific agencies needed.”

In June, Have You Heard? reported that nine state agencies, including more than 700 employees, will leave the Finney building when the state’s lease expires on Sept. 30.

KDHE will take the entire seventh floor of the R.H. Garvey Building at 300 W. Douglas. That’s 10,566 square feet.

The Human Rights Commission is taking 1,800 square feet on the second floor.

Fertig says the commission is a smaller agency with a limited budget.

“The Garvey Center was able to really work with them to … kind of retrofit the space so it was really what they needed at a very affordable rate.”

Larry Weber, who handled the deal for Builders Inc., says he’s “excited to have them here and remaining in downtown.”

Both spaces are areas that Harrington Health has been in or been using for storage, Weber says.

All but a couple of the agencies that either are in or have been in the Finney building have made or are close to making deals for new space.

The largest of those agencies and the one to spur the move, the Department for Children and Families, is close to finalizing a deal at 2601 S. Oliver where the U.S. Postal Service has had a remote encoding center.

Robert’s Shoe Shine Services moving to Garvey Center

Robert Cook shines Joye Teeters man at the Garvey Center.WICHITA — Except for airports, it’s rare to see many shoe shine men these days.

“There are so many people who don’t even know where to get a shine at today,” says Robert Cook, who has Robert’s Shoe Shine Services. “It’s a dying art.”

Cook is transitioning his business from a couple of Joe’s Seat Cover & Carwash stores to the kiva lobby at the Garvey Center. He won’t be there on a full-time basis for another couple of weeks.

Former Garvey Center shoe shine man Richard Henry died almost a year ago. Cook says another couple of shoe shine men in the area have died as well.

“It seemed like it created a void, so I’m here to fill that.”

Cook worked in a number of other jobs before deciding to enter the shoe shine business eight years ago after he was laid off from Safelite AutoGlass.

“Getting laid off just didn’t fit me too well,” Cook says. “I decided I didn’t want to get mixed up in that anymore. … I just thought it would be better to be independent.”

He says the Garvey Center makes sense for a number of reasons.

“I just think that that area is growing.”

Also, he says, “The spirit over there just seems to be appropriate.”

Cook says he’ll be located near Sheer Voltage Salon.

“We’re going to kind of have each other’s back,” Cook says of the women who own and work at the salon.

Cook hopes females will be a key part of his business.

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Squid Ink Creative and Computer Training Systems expand at Garvey Center

WICHITA — Squid Ink Creative is expanding at the Garvey Center at 200 W. Douglas.

“We’re growing,” says Brad Painchaud, director of business development. “We’re looking at room for growth in the next couple of years.”

The company, which is a full-service advertising agency, has 4,000 square feet and is expanding to almost 6,000 square feet.

“We’ve been making a bigger push to go after some new clients,” Painchaud says. “We’ve been successful with a few.”

Squid Ink owners Mark Karlin and Frank Lichtlin also own CTS, or Computer Training Systems, and have it in the same space. Painchaud says there may be some growth with CTS as well, but the main growth is with Squid Ink.

Currently, the agency has an open-concept office, but Painchaud says there’s a need for more private areas.

“We’re just trying to create some better meeting spaces.”

The agency is looking to make some hires as well.

Painchaud says there was no question about staying in the Garvey Center, where the agency has been for more than a decade.

“It’s centrally located for pretty much everyone.”

He says manager Larry Weber is helpful.

“Larry’s been great,” Painchaud says. “You know, the Garvey Center’s been good to us.”

Shear Voltage to leave the Collective for expanded space at the Garvey Center

WICHITA — A salon is opening in the former Bob’s Place barber shop at the Garvey Center downtown.

Jennifer Collins and Shelby Cheatum are moving their Shear Voltage salon from a small suite at the Collective near 21st and Greenwich to the Garvey Center on July 1.

“We’re just really excited to be in the downtown area and continue to grow our business,” Collins says.

She and Cheatum have been cutting hair together for about seven years and opened their business almost two years ago. They purposely started small because they heard the first couple of years in any business are particularly rough, Collins says. She says they’ve been successful, though, and are ready to grow.

The new space is 1,512 square feet.

Adam Clements and Larry Weber of Builders Inc. handled the deal.

The expanded salon will have eight stylists and offer a range of services in addition to hair care. That includes spray tans, massage, body waxing, makeup, eyelash extensions and, eventually, manicures and pedicures.

Collins says it makes sense to move downtown now.

“I think we’re hitting it at the time that we can grow with the downtown area.”

Bob Martin to open Law Office of Robert G. Martin at the R.H. Garvey Building

WICHITA — Bob Martin has left McDonald, Tinker, Skaer, Quinn & Herrington to start his own law firm, but he hasn’t gone far.

His Law Office of Robert G. Martin officially opens Wednesday in almost 2,000 square feet on the fourth floor of the R.H. Garvey Building at 300 W. Douglas.

That’s one floor below McDonald, Tinker.

“It’s a chance for me to do more of my niche,” Martin says.

He’s been at McDonald, Tinker, where he’s been a director and shareholder, since 1987.

“I’m top of the letterhead, actually.”

He says the firm primarily focuses on litigation, and that’s not his specialty.

“I’ll never do criminal law in my life again,” Martin says. “The practice of law has become specialized.”

Martin will focus on estate planning and workers compensation defense work.

“Those are the only two areas I will be emphasizing going forward.”

Why?

“Because I enjoy ’em. I’m good at it.”

He says estate planning can be more pleasant than other types of legal work.

“We call this area of the law ‘happy law,’” Martin says. “You’re making people have a better outcome for their lives and their families and their possessions. You’re proactively preventing problems.”

In the workers comp arena, he says, “I’m trying to make the best of a difficult situation.”

Martin says by starting his own firm, he’ll have more resources.

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SBA office to move to the Garvey Center using new streamlined design process

Wayne Bell, district director of the Small Business Administration.

WICHITA — The government is better known for red tape than streamlined processes, but the General Services Administration is working on that, and a change in offices for the Small Business Administration is going to offer something of a test case.

The SBA’s Wichita district office is moving from 271 W. Third St., where the IRS is, to the Page Court Building at the Garvey Center at 220 E. Douglas.

Before the move can happen, there has to be a design phase, which could determine everything from the tint of the windows to security systems in the new office.

“Normally, the process would take … 60 days or more,” says Wayne Bell, the SBA’s district director.

The GSA has a new design intent drawing process that will convene everyone involved in the move — contractors, designers, the SBA, the GSA, a representative for the landlord and anyone else connected with the project.

“You’re going to have all of the players in the room,” Bell says. “With this approach, everything should be complete within a three-day timeframe. It’s a really, really good idea.”

The old way of doing things involved sending drawings to the GSA, then the SBA, which would make changes before sending it back to the GSA. Then the contractor would get the drawings after a protracted period.

“So it could take months,” Bell says.

The design intent drawing creates a condensed timeframe where there’s an on-the-spot rough draft of the SBA’s needs that gets refined immediately with everyone present.

“This is very new,” Bell says. “So it’s going to be kind of an on-the-job learning process.”

The meetings will take place over a three-day period in late October at the Wichita Downtown Development Corp.’s design innovation center.

“What we try to do in that space is make resources available,” says WDDC president Jeff Fluhr.

That includes conference calling and video conferencing.

“We’re thrilled they’re willing to take the opportunity,” Fluhr says of the SBA and GSA. He says the attitude is “let’s walk through it and see what we learn from it.”

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CASA of Sedgwick County to move to the Garvey Center

WICHITA — CASA of Sedgwick County is leaving 150 N. Main St. for the Garvey Center.

Real Development just has failed to … live up to their promises,” says Anne Duncan, CASA’s executive director, referring to the owner of CASA’s current building.

Duncan says there are maintenance issues, such as an elevator that has had repeated problems, and Real Development is “not being very attentive to those types of things.”

Neither Michael Elzufon nor Dave Lundberg of Real Development returned calls for comment.

Duncan says the move, which will happen July 28, will give CASA 2,640 square feet compared to its current 1,600 square feet.

“We need more space and a place to do training,” Duncan says. “That’s one of our big considerations.”

The nonprofit trains volunteers to advocate for abused and neglected children in court.

“We’re just really excited to be able to deliver all of our training on site,” Duncan says.

Larry Weber of Builders Inc. handled the deal.

CASA will move into the Kiva at the Garvey Center, which is across from Papa John’s Pizza.

Duncan says she’s pleased that CASA can remain centrally located “without fighting for parking.”

Law Offices of Eldon Boisseau returns to the O.W. Garvey building downtown

WICHITA — Eldon Boisseau has moved his Law Offices of Eldon Boisseau back to the O.W. Garvey building downtown at 200 W. Douglas.

“I actually started my legal practice in the top floor of this building more years ago than I want to talk about,” Boisseau says.

For the record, it was 1973.

Over the weekend, Boisseau moved into 2,546 square feet on the first floor, which brings the building to 100 percent occupancy.

The law office has been in about 2,000 square feet at River Park Place at 727 N. Waco along the Arkansas River.

“I’ve looked at that river for 30 years,” Boisseau says. “I don’t think it’s made me any money. … I just don’t need to look at that river anymore.”

Instead, he says he’s going to enjoy the high ceilings, open space and glass at his new office.

Larry Weber of Builders Inc. and Tony Utter of Utter Commercial Real Estate handled the deal.

St. Louis-based Reeg Lawyers, which recently expanded to Wichita by sharing space with Boisseau, also is moving to the new space.

The Law Offices of Eldon Boisseau today is a two-lawyer firm, as it was when it began.

At one point, the firm had more than 150 employees in four cities before it split into other firms.

Boisseau says he doesn’t want to be that big again, but he is looking to expand.

“My plan is to grow, absolutely.”