Author Archives: Carrie Rengers

Method Productions to move to Old Town

WICHITA — As Have You Heard? reported Monday, Jacque Waite and her Jacque Inc. Photography are now in the Grant Telegraph Centre in Old Town, and Method Productions will be joining her next week.

“We have a rapport and a friendship with her,” says Method Productions’ Luis Rodriguez. “It just made sense to do it together.”

Method Productions is a 2-year-old full-service video production company that Gabe Juhnke and Rik Dubiel started from their homes.

They now share space with Burly Studios on Commerce Street.

“We were collaborating with (Burly) on some bigger projects,” Rodriguez says. “We co-located because it made sense.”

As Method Productions needed studio space, though, it started using Waite’s studio next to Caffe Moderne. When she learned her lease would not be renewed so the Morris, Laing, Evans, Brock & Kennedy, Chartered law firm could expand there, Waite and Method Productions began talking.

“We’ve got a whole collection of clients who need and want this,” Rodriguez says of having an on-site studio.

“It’s just part of our growth and our success.”

Method Productions does a range of video production.

“If you want a professionally produced video that’s short and sweet, we do that,” Rodriguez says. “If you want something elaborate, we do that, too.”

He says the company wants “to be Target for video production,” meaning he says it offers quality work at affordable prices.

“We are looking to kind of make the video production process custom to the customer.”

Rodriguez says a studio and office in the same space will help with that.

“We’re excited to do it. It’s a big jump for us, and we think it’ll just take us to the next level.”

GreenAcres Market finishes Whole Foods Association conversion with new signs

WICHITA — The final phase of converting Wichita’s Whole Foods Association stores to GreenAcres Markets is happening Wednesday when signs at the three stores will be replaced.

That includes the Whole Foods Association store in the Clear Lakes shopping center near the southwest corner of 21st and Amidon and the one near the southwest corner of 21st and Maize.

It also includes the Whole Foods Association store in Normandie at Central and Woodlawn. That sign had been looming over the center about three decades.

“It was there forever,” says GreenAcres owner Barb Hoffmann. “If you look at it, it looks like it was.”

In January, Hoffmann and her husband, John, purchased the Wichita Whole Foods Association stores, which have no affiliation with the larger Whole Foods Market, which opens Sept. 3 at the Waterfront at 13th and Webb.

In May, the Hoffmanns and Whole Foods Market announced that they struck a deal for the Austin-based chain to use the Whole Foods name here instead of the Bread & Circus name it looked like it might have to use.

Next up, Hoffmann says she has expansion and remodeling plans for most of her new stores.

She’s expanding the Clear Lakes store from 3,500 square feet to 6,500 square feet.

“We’ll start it here in the near future,” Hoffmann says. The idea, she says, is “just more offerings” for the neighborhood.

“It’s a real ethnic store. We’ll have a lot of ethnic items.”

The 6,000-square-foot far-west-side store will undergo an expansion next spring, though Hoffmann isn’t sure how much it will increase by yet.

Hoffmann says she’s also remodeling the 23,000-square-foot GreenAcres in Oklahoma City.

At the original GreenAcres at Bradley Fair, Hoffmann is remodeling the bathrooms but won’t do major remodeling until spring. For now, she’s focusing on the newer stores.

“We’re really thrilled we have these stores,” she says. “Every one has such a unique customer base, and we have just really enjoyed learning all the parts of the city.”

Urban Air Trampoline Park to open in former Pure Entertainment space on west side

WICHITA — On the heels of Get Air Wichita opening downtown in April, Wichita is about to get its second indoor trampoline park.

“It’s finally all coming together,” Wichitan Jon Becker says.

He and his family are opening Urban Air Trampoline Park in the former Pure Entertainment space at 8545 W. Irving, which is next to the Midwest Kia dealership at Kellogg and Tyler.

Pure Entertainment has suspended operations until the business secures new space.

Becker and his family, including his wife, Annie, and daughters, Allie, 6, and Hailey, 9, were vacationing in Texas when they discovered Urban Air.

“We just had an absolute blast as a family,” Jon Becker says.

“We took them there,” he says of his kids, “and I think we ended up having just as much fun as them.”

Their Urban Air will be the fifth in the chain and the first one outside of Texas. There are three more in the works elsewhere that others are doing.

Becker says he thought the Pure Entertainment building would be perfect as it was, but he says that has turned out not to be the case.

“We’re gutting the entire 25,500 square feet and starting over.”

Becker says that’s in an effort to make the place as comfortable as possible so parents and grandparents “actually want to spend time and stay there. It’s not just drop the kids off and go.”

There will be areas within the park for various activities, such as an open jump area, a basketball jumping area, a foam pit, a runway for gymnastics, two dodgeball courts and an area for children 5 and under.

“Our whole concept is different than a lot of other trampoline parks around the area,” Becker says.

He says he knows he has competition, but Becker says being from Wichita, he and his wife feel like they know the market.

“We’ve specifically chosen that area,” he says of the west side.

Becker says it’s easily accessible from the east and west sides since it’s along Kellogg, and it’s especially close to the growing areas of Goddard and Maize.

The Beckers hope to open sometime in November.

Jon Becker isn’t sure if this will be the family’s only Urban Air.

“Can Wichita justify an east and a west? I don’t know,” he says. “Right now we’re just holding the reins back.”

Becker says he is excited to have his daughters see the business come to life.

“We’re doing this all as a family project.”

Becker, who has been in medical sales, and his wife, who is a first grade teacher in Andover, have always wanted their own business, he says.

“This is the first idea my wife’s ever actually agreed with me on.”

You don’t say

“It’ll be finally nice to have money at least coming two directions instead of just going one direction.”

Mike Dandurand on getting the new Dandurand Drugstore open at 21st and Ridge

Firefly Yoga Studio to go on the road; Satya Moon Yoga to open in its place

WICHITA — Firefly Yoga Studio owner Nickki Head is taking her business on the road.

“I have decided to sell the studio space to my lead instructor,” Head says of Katerina Gavin. “It’ll be a really smooth transition.”

Gavin is renaming the studio, which is in the Shops at Tallgrass at 21st and Rock Road, Satya Moon Yoga. That loosely translates to unchanging truth or absolute truth.

Head opened Firefly three and a half years ago and added a west-side studio in 2012. The west-side space, which is at at 2313 Zoo Park Blvd., is closing at the end of this month.

The east-side studio will close Aug. 31 and reopen as Satya Sept. 1.

Head then will move to Denver where she has family and, at least initially, do guest teaching at various yoga studios around the Midwest.

“Owning a studio kind of ties you down to one location,” Head says. “I really just want to keep traveling with it right now.”

Head says it’s been a fantastic run here.

“I’ll be sad to leave Wichita but definitely excited for the next chapter in my life.”

Jacque Inc. Photography to move within Old Town

UPDATED — Photographer Jacque Waite is moving her Jacque Inc. Photography within Old Town this week.

Waite’s studio and office has been to the east of Caffe Moderne for three and a half years, but the Morris, Laing, Evans, Brock & Kennedy, Chartered law firm will be expanding into her space.

The studio now will be on the first floor of the Grant Telegraph Centre at 140 N. Mead.

At the new space, Waite says she’ll be sharing her studio with Method Productions.

Waite says her work doesn’t depend on her studio being especially visible, but it may now have more exposure than it has had.

“I ended up in some people’s Facebook pictures … when they’re at Oeno,” she says. Otherwise, Waite says, “I don’t think people always see it.”

Nectar of the Gods Vape Shop to open in Sweetbriar at 21st and Amidon

WICHITA — Before he decided to open his own electronic cigarette shop, David Ford tried to count how many there already are in Wichita.

It’s hard to come up with an exact figure, but suffice it to say there are a lot.

That didn’t deter Ford, though, who is opening Nectar of the Gods Vape Shop in the Sweetbriar shopping center on the northwest corner of 21st and Amidon.

“There’s two hookah lounges right there … but there’s no vape shops in any kind of proximity to that area,” Ford says. “That’s the whole reason I went there.”

The store will open in early September. Ford may open more shops after that.

“I would like to,” he says. “We’ll see how it works out.”

Andy Boyd of Walter Morris Cos. handled the deal.

Ford says the juices that people can vape come in all sorts of flavors, such as a New York cheesecake that offers all of the flavor “without all the … guilt of the calories you’re putting on.”

“It’s basically nectar,” he says of the juices.

He says nectar of the gods is fabled to have lifesaving powers.

“If you get people off of smoking, they can live a little longer,” Ford says. “That’s the whole point behind Nectar of the Gods.”

You don’t say

“In our town of 10,000 people, we have the kind of lifestyle filmmakers try to re-create.”

– An excerpt of a winning essay, “Say Hello to Haysville,” that Susan Armstrong of Armstrong Chamberlin Strategic Marketing wrote for a Shelter Insurance contest

Panda Express to open at Derby Marketplace

WICHITA — Panda Express is going to open a third Wichita-area restaurant, this time in Derby.

The fast casual concept will go in the Derby Marketplace at Meadowlark and Rock Road. Panda will be in 2,350 square feet on the opposite end of the building where Starbucks is.

There’s another 3,200 square feet left to lease in the building.

The California-based Panda entered the Wichita market in 2010 with stores on Maize Road in front of Academy Sports & Outdoors and at One Kellogg Place on East Kellogg.

Leisa Lowry of J.P. Weigand & Sons represents the chain in the Wichita area.

Panda is similar to Chipotle in that diners walk through a line and first select a starch — steamed or fried rice or chow mein — and vegetables followed by two to three entrees.

Entrees consist of traditional Chinese dishes such as kung pao chicken, sweet-and-sour pork and beef and broccoli.

Look for more details on the Derby Panda as they become available.

Riordan Clinic plans affiliate clinics among other changes

brianWICHITA — After a three-year period of diminished involvement with the Riordan Clinic, CEO Brian Riordan is back.

“A lot of people are … leaving traditional medicine and moving over to what we do,” Riordan says. “That kind of excited me to the possibilities.”

That’s leading to some changes at the clinic, which Riordan’s late father, Hugh, founded in 1975.

“In those 39 years, it’s been more or less the same type of operation,” Riordan says.

That’s meant one campus at 3100 N. Hillside.

“We feel it’s our obligation to our legacy to kind of step up our presence a bit – or quite a bit,” Riordan says.

He’ll do that through affiliate clinics, the first of which will open by Sept. 1 at 1010 E. 17th St. in Hays.

“That will be our first non Wichita location,” Riordan says. “We can imagine a time when there’s … more than 100.”

The immediate goal is four affiliates by next year and 20 within four years. Riordan Clinic, which once was known as the Center for the Improvement of Human Functioning International, has 40 employees. Riordan anticipates needing 80 by 2018.

The clinic is known for its high-dose vitamin C treatments. Riordan says those types of treatments have “immense potential” and are getting more notice in the media.

“We kind of arrived in terms of acceptance,” Riordan says. “Our way of thinking and our treatment modalities have gone from fringe to mainstream.”

The first step the clinic takes with patients, or “co-learners” as Riordan calls them, is to test their blood “to understand where they might be deficient or have too much of something, and we try to balance those things first.”

“We try to understand each person’s biochemical individuality.”

Riordan says the clinic is still learning about vitamin C treatments.

“We’re kind of tuning it for each different malady.”

For instance, he says cancer treatments work better with doses given every other day while treatments for bacteria and viruses work better every day.

Riordan says the clinic has three missions: research, education and co-learning, or the treatment of patients. He says the research and education will remain in Wichita.

“We’ll be growing that over time,” he says.

“Affiliates will be able to help us to be able to see more patients,” Riordan says. “We think it’s incumbent upon us to be able to offer that at a wider base.”

He says he plans to tackle another longtime mission of the clinic, and that’s to give people seeking treatment a place to stay.

“We’d like to start putting one or two up per year,” Riordan says of small living spaces.

He hopes to accommodate 20 temporary residents by 2018.

Riordan also is exploring the idea of vitamin C manufacturing on the clinic’s 92 acres, only about 15 of which are currently in use.

“Sometimes it’s very easy to get, sometimes it’s very difficult to get,” he says of vitamin C.

Riordan says the clinic may use some acreage to produce non-corn-related organic vitamin C.

Part of the clinic’s acreage is a nature preserve that will remain.

Part of it is farmed by a local farmer, and Riordan says the clinic is talking with the Land Institute in Salina for help with it.

Since Riordan’s April return, the clinic began offering nutritional supplements, which it calls nutrients. There are 18 branded products so far.

Other smaller changes are coming to the clinic as well. Its first solar panel will be installed in September for alternative energy.

“Our electric bill’s way, way higher than we’d like it to be,” Riordan says. He says he wants it cut in half by 2018.

Also, he’s working with Gallery XII to increase art on the campus.

“I’m trying to make our (campus) more beautiful and help with the healing process through art,” he says.

Riordan doesn’t see a full-service restaurant returning to the campus because he thinks it’s too remote to attract enough regular diners.

“Down the road, we would like to have the organic garden supply a juicing corner.”

Also, Riordan says one day there could be some light, grab-and-go type of food.

The Riordan Clinic is going through a lot of changes at once, but Riordan doesn’t think it’s too much.

“It’s very realistic.”

He says there’s “a talented staff and a supportive board” to make it happen.

“What we have to offer is synching all of a sudden with what society wants. I personally don’t think it’s too much. It’s what we have to provide.”