Daily Archives: Feb. 24, 2014

You don’t say

“If we at Spangles were running our business this way, people would quit coming to us and go someplace else.”

– Spangles spokeswoman Rene Steven’s comment after a long ordeal at the tag office, for which she says she blames the system, not the workers

Businessmen Leon Moeder and Michael Carmody create new kind of welcome sign

UPDATED — With the speed of social media, businessman Leon Moeder is getting his wish.

On Saturday, Moeder expressed his frustration with a Kansas House bill, which the Senate then rejected, to allow businesses to refuse service to same-sex couples. On Facebook, he wrote: “I want a window sign that says, ‘WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO PROVIDE SERVICE TO EVERYONE.’”

Michael Carmody within seconds said . . . he would prepare something,” Moeder says of his tenant, who is co-owner of the Donut Whole.

“They’re at the printers right now,” Moeder says.

By this afternoon, he’ll have 500 at his real estate office at 122 S. Hydraulic.

“First off, it’s the right thing to do,” Moeder says. “I just have a problem with people being mean to other people.”

There’s a rally to end inequality in Topeka on Tuesday, and Moeder hopes someone can take his signs there.

“You know, Kansas was founded on progressive ideas,” he says.

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Two state agencies sign at Garvey Center

UPDATED — The state has completed two more leases for agencies that will be leaving the Finney State Office Building.

The Kansas Department of Health & Environment and the Kansas Human Rights Commission will be moving to the Garvey Center.

“We were just really impressed with the spaces we visited,” says Todd Fertig, a spokesman for the Department of Administration. “They fit a lot better with what these specific agencies needed.”

In June, Have You Heard? reported that nine state agencies, including more than 700 employees, will leave the Finney building when the state’s lease expires on Sept. 30.

KDHE will take the entire seventh floor of the R.H. Garvey Building at 300 W. Douglas. That’s 10,566 square feet.

The Human Rights Commission is taking 1,800 square feet on the second floor.

Fertig says the commission is a smaller agency with a limited budget.

“The Garvey Center was able to really work with them to … kind of retrofit the space so it was really what they needed at a very affordable rate.”

Larry Weber, who handled the deal for Builders Inc., says he’s “excited to have them here and remaining in downtown.”

Both spaces are areas that Harrington Health has been in or been using for storage, Weber says.

All but a couple of the agencies that either are in or have been in the Finney building have made or are close to making deals for new space.

The largest of those agencies and the one to spur the move, the Department for Children and Families, is close to finalizing a deal at 2601 S. Oliver where the U.S. Postal Service has had a remote encoding center.