Daily Archives: Nov. 2, 2010

Pompeo declares victory; Goyle concedes

pompeowins10:48 p.m. — In the afterglow of Mike Pompeo’s 4th District congressional victory, his supporters basked in the statewide sweep they’d planned for years and expected for weeks.

Treatha Brown-Foster said that Goyle worked hard, but that Pompeo worked even harder on the campaign trail. “Mike didn’t take anything for granted,” she said.

She said she expects Republicans to make a real difference in Congress, but she noted that President Obama still has veto power. “We’re going to see if he’ll (Obama) work with Republicans,” she said.

Bob Aldrich said Pompeo’s message on jobs and smaller government caught people’s attention. “Voters are fed up and tired,” he said. “They want to be heard and nobody’s listening.”

The huge crowd at Pompeo’s party was shoulder-to-shoulder, except near the two airplanes parked in each corner. The campaigns said it planned for about 1,000 people. The crowd appeared close to that.

Several people said that it was the biggest election party they’ve seen in Sedgwick County. The event was catered, had a cash bar, professional lighting and sound and a live band. Read More »

Tiahrt says he’s “relaxed” as he casts his last ballot before leaving Congress

Tiahrt

Tiahrt

Todd Tiahrt cast his election-day ballot about 2 p.m. today, likely his last vote as the congressman representing Kansas’ 4th district and the first time in 20 years he hasn’t been on the ballot himself.

Tiahrt, a Republican, was all smiles as he waited in the 20-minute line with constituents at the polling place at the Church of the Holy Spirit in his hometown of Goddard.

“I think I’m the most relaxed I’ve been in 20 years on Election Day,” Tiahrt said. He added that he was expecting it to be a big day for his party.

Tiahrt’s first run for office was a narrow defeat for state House in 1990, which he followed up by winning a state Senate seat in 1992.

Tiahrt has served for 16 years in Congress, elected in the 1994 Republican surge that gave the GOP control of the House for the next 12 years.

This year is expected to return Republicans to the majority in the House.

But Tiahrt passed on what would have been an almost-certain re-election to seek the Senate seat being vacated by Sam Brownback, who decided to leave Washington to run for governor. Tiahrt lost in the primary to his House colleague, Rep. Jerry Moran, R-Hays.

As soon-to-be ordinary citizen Tiahrt, he said he voted a straight ticket for the Republicans, although in Kansas, unlike some other states, a voter has to vote in each individual race to get that done.

“Which is fine, Tiahrt said. “I like looking at their names.”

Tiahrt will still have to return to Washington for a “lame-duck” session before the new members take office in January.

Goyle, Pompeo making final pitches in 4th District race

Goyle

Goyle

Pompeo

Pompeo

Both Raj Goyle and Mike Pompeo got an early start this morning on their final pitch as voters go to the polls in the 4th Congressional District.

Goyle broke from the gate first at 5:32 a.m. with an e-mail to supporters headlined “Today is THE DAY.”

Goyle, D-Wichita, highlighted his record as a state legislator, saying he voted to cut taxes and reduce spending, worked across the aisle with Republicans and wrote the law restricting funeral protests by Fred Phelps.

“In Congress, I promise to wake up every morning and go to bed every night working to protect and create Kansas jobs,” Goyle wrote. “I promise to fight outsourcing and work to reward companies for creating jobs in America, not overseas. I promise to work to restore fiscal discipline. And as I did in the State House, I promise to work with anyone for good ideas, regardless of ideology or party label. “

Fourteen minutes later, Pompeo, a Republican national committeeman, was up with his message, headlined “Thank You and Bless You.”

“Today is the day that we have all been pointed towards for so long,” Pompeo wrote. “It’s the day Americans, individually, choose their preference for leadership and the day those who have offered themselves as leaders learn whether the call is for them. It is how we keep our Republic strong.

“Susan, Nick and I are looking forward to spending today with you. It will provide us a chance to say thank you to each of you who have knocked on one more door, made one more phone call, and pushed out one more sign.”

The Pompeo message linked to a video of his Aunt Joan praising him during a campaign lunch in Wellington.