Category Archives: Boeing

Boeing finalizes order from Emirates for 150 777X jetliners

Boeing and Emirates Airline have finalized an order for 150 777Xs, valued at $56 billion at list prices, Boeing announced Wednesday.

The order was first announced as a commitment at the Dubai Airshow last year.  Emirates is the largest 777 operator in the world.

The order is for 115 777-9Xs and 35 777-8Xs. It also includes purchase rights for another 50 planes, which if exercised could increase the order’s value to about $75 billion at list prices.

Spirit AeroSystems builds the 777′s forward fuselage in Wichita.

The 777X is an upgraded version of the 777.

The first 777X delivery is expected in 2020.

Boeing has 300 orders and commitments for the model from six customers.

 

Boeing delivers first 787-9 Dreamliner to Air New Zealand

Boeing delivered its first 787-9 Dreamliner Wednesday to launch customer Air New Zealand, the company said.

The milestone was marked by a celebration in Everett, Wash., attended by about 1,000 employees, airline executives and guests.

Spirit AeroSystems builds the plane’s composite nose section in Wichita.

The delivery of the 787-9 is the first of 10 planes on order from Air New Zealand and are part of the airline’s fleet modernization effort.

The 787-9 is a derivative of Boeing’s 787-8. The version is stretched by 20 feet and will carry up to 40 more passengers an additional 450 nautical miles, Boeing said.

Boeing has orders for 409 787-9s from 26 customers. That accounts for 40 percent of all 787 orders, it said.

Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner earns government certifications

Boeing‘s 787-9 Dreamliner has been certified for commercial service by the Federal Aviation Administration and the European Aviation Safety Agency.

Boeing is in the final stages of preparing for the first 787-9 delivery to its launch customer Air New Zealand.

The 787-9 is a stretched version of the 787-8 now in service. Its fuselage is 20 feet longer over the 787-8 and will fly more passengers and more cargo farther distances, the company said.

Spirit AeroSystems in Wichita builds the plane’s nose section.

Boeing has taken 413 orders for the 787-9 from 26 customers. That accounts for 40 percent of all 787 orders, the company said.

“Certification is the culmination of years of hard work and a rigorous flight-test program that started with the 787-9′s first flight in September,” Ray Conner, Boeing Commercial Airplanes president and CEO, said in a statement. “With this validation that the airplane is ready for commercial operations, Boeing along with our airline and leasing customers now look forward to introducing the newest member of the Dreamliner family to passengers around the world.”

The FAA has also granted Boeing an Amended Production Certificate, which validates that Boeing’s production system can produce 787-9s that conform to the design.

The certifications follow a comprehensive test program using five airplanes accumulating more than 1,500 hours of flight testing, plus ground and laboratory testing.

 

 

Boeing sells 777-300ER for use as a business aircraft

Boeing has sold a Boeing 777-300ER for use as a business aircraft to an undisclosed customer, the company said.

The year has been good for Boeing business jet order activity, Capt. Steve Taylor, president of Boeing’s business jet division, said in a statement. “Customers are showing strong interest in our wide-body VIP products, and the BBJ 777-300 ER is an airplane that really provides unmatched comfort and range on long-haul flights.”

It’s the second widebody business jet order this year, the company said.

Boeing introduced the commercial 747-8 and the 787 in 2006 for business use. Since then, widebody jets have accounted for about 40 percent of the business aircraft orders, the company said.

The 777-300ER has a cabin size of 3,641 square feet and a range of 9,220 nautical miles.

Boeing delivers the VIP planes to customers without the customized interior. A completion center of the customer’s choosing then installs the interior.

Boeing’s business jet line includes modified 737 single-aisle commercial airplanes as well as the twin-aisle 747-8, 767, 777 and 787.

Since 1996 when Boeing formed its business jet division, the company has delivered 195 business aircraft and taken orders for 217.

Analyst: Spirit AeroSystems outsourcing of fab work would make sense; Tulsa sale a ‘wild card’

It would make sense for Spirit AeroSystems to outsource its fabrication operation, Cowen and Co. analyst Cai von Rumohr wrote in a note to investors.

A story in The Eagle last week said Spirit appears to be exploring that option.

“It would make sense to outsource fab work to a major Tier 2 build-to-print supplier, like PCP (Precision Castparts), which offers lower costs in return for higher market share,” von Rumohr wrote.

Cost savings could include more efficient machining utilization rates and lower material costs, such as internally sourced titanium, he wrote.

“Thus, while it’s impossible to size a potential outsourcing deal, it likely would be a win-win-win,” von Rumohr wrote.

In addition, Spirit’s recent update of its master contract with Boeing reduces risk for Spirit, he said.

Spirit and Boeing announced the master contract in April.

The pricing covers the Boeing 737, 747, 767 and 777 programs through Dec. 31, 2015.

The contract allows for price increases if production rates dip and for continued 737 and 777 profitability, he said. It also avoids locking Spirit into a risky long-term fixed price agreement.

In the meantime, a possible sale of Spirit’s Tulsa operation is still a “wild card,” von Rumohr wrote.

Spirit has been exploring a sale of that operation.

“We retain our ‘show me’ attitude toward (Spirit’s) possible sale of its Tulsa wing business,” he said.

That’s because Boeing and Gulfstream programs, which it has there, may attract two different buyers, von Rumohr wrote.

In addition, the work is done in one location, and any sale will require new contracts with Boeing and Gulstream. who might require price concessions in return for the agreement, von Rumohr wrote.

The sale of the Tulsa facility or a major fabrication outsourcing deal, however, would bolster investor confidence in Spirit’s cash flow outlook, he said.

Boeing continues to send 787 sections to Wichita

Boeing 787 center fuselage sections continue to be shipped to Wichita from Italy for temporary storage, according to an analyst who is monitoring the situation.

David Strauss, an aerospace analyst with UBS, is tracking movements of Boeing’s Dreamlifter fleet to gauge the progress of 787 Dreamliner production.

Boeing is using four heavily modified 747s called Dreamlifters to move 787 sections built by its suppliers to its assembly lines in Everett, Wash., and Charlotte, N.C.

A number of flights from Italy that are supposed to go to Charleston are instead coming to Wichita, Strauss wrote in a note to investors.

“We believe deliveries are being diverted to Wichita to help alleviate the bottleneck in Charleston around the 787-9,” he wrote.

Specifically, Strauss said UBS has tracked 30 Dreamlifter flights into Everett from major structural suppliers in May, slightly lower than in April. There also have been 10 arrivals into Charleston from Japan and Wichita to support Boeing’s second final assembly line. That was slightly lower than in April.

It also tracked 11 deliveries from Boeing supplier Alenia in Italy to Charleston in May, a new high.

 

Boeing delivers fourth P-8I aircraft to Indian Navy

Boeing has delivered the fourth P-8I maritime patrol aircraft to India, which fulfills the first half of a contract for eight planes, the company said.

The shipment was made on schedule, it said,

Spirit AeroSystems in Wichita builds major portions of the plane, including the fuselage.

The P-8I is the Indian Navy variant of the P-8a Poseidon that Boeing has developed for the U.S. Navy.

The aircraft is based on Boeing’s 737 commercial jetliner.

“The Indian Navy is putting the first three P-8Is through their paces operationally, and the P-8I delivered today (Friday) will begin flight trials in the coming months,” Leland Wright, Boeing P-8I program manager, said in a statement.

Boeing, Embraer to open joint aviation biofuel research center

Boeing and Embraer have agreed to open a joint research center to advance a sustainable aviation biofuel industry in Brazil, Boeing said Monday.

The two will perform joint biofuel research and fund and coordinate research with Brazilian universities and other institutions.

The research center will be located in Sao Jose dos Campos in Brazil.

Research will focus on technologies that address gaps in a supply chain for sustainable aviation fuel in Brazil, such as feedstock production and processing technologies, Boeing said.

Aviation biofuel emits 50 percent to 80 percent lower carbon emissions through its lifecycle than petroleum jet fuel when produced sustainably, it said.

More than 1,500 passenger flights using biofuel have been conducted around the world since the fuel was approved for use in 2011.

Boeing, Spirit AeroSystems reach milestone with delivery of 8,000th Boeing 737

Boeing celebrated delivery of the 8,000th 737 single-aisle commercial airliner to come off the production line on Wednesday, which also marks a milestone for Spirit AeroSystems.

Spirit, and Boeing’s Wichita commercial airline division before it, have built the fuselages for all 8,000 planes.

Spirit builds the fuselage, pylons and thrust reversers in Wichita and wing components in Tulsa.

Boeing has more than 3,700 Boeing 737′s on order. That includes 1,934 orders for the 737 MAX, an upgraded version with new engines.

The 8,000th 737 was delivered to United Airlines. Since 1965, United has taken delivery of more than 550 737s.

Boeing has been raising 737 production with continued rising demand.

Since 2010, it’s increased production from 31.5 planes a month to today’s rate of 42 per month. It’s planning production increases to 47 a month in 2017, and has hinted that production could be raised beyond that.

“The 737 program continues to innovate with new features and technology, meeting the needs of our customers now and into the future,” Beverly Wyse, Boeing vice president and general manager of the 737 program, said in a statement. “Boeing has a long and treasured history with United Airlines, and we’re proud they’re taking delivery of this milestone airplane.”

 

Boeing launches the BBJ MAX

Boeing launched the Boeing Business Jet, or BBJ, MAX family of airplanes after receiving the first order from a customer.

It’s not disclosing the name of the customer.

The order is for the BBJ MAX 8, based on a 737 MAX 8, an updated 737 commercial jet with new engines, winglets and other improvements.

It’s a business jet with a range of 6,325 nautical miles.

“We are honored that an existing BBJ customer has become the first to select the BBJ MAX,” Capt. Steve Taylor, president, Boeing Business Jets, said in a statement. “The BBJ MAX provides more room, longer range and emits fewer emissions than its nearest competition, making it an ideal choice for today’s BBJ customers.”

The new BBJ family also will include the BBJ MAX 9, based on the 737 MAX 9, and is expected to offer a 6,255 nautical mile range. Plans for a BBJ MAX 7 are being studied.

Development of the 737 MAX is on schedule, the company said. First flight is expected in 2016 with deliveries to commercial airline customers starting in 2017.

Boeing has taken orders for more than 1,900 737 MAX jets from 37 customers.