Category Archives: Aviation industry suppliers

Boeing finalizes order from Emirates for 150 777X jetliners

Boeing and Emirates Airline have finalized an order for 150 777Xs, valued at $56 billion at list prices, Boeing announced Wednesday.

The order was first announced as a commitment at the Dubai Airshow last year.  Emirates is the largest 777 operator in the world.

The order is for 115 777-9Xs and 35 777-8Xs. It also includes purchase rights for another 50 planes, which if exercised could increase the order’s value to about $75 billion at list prices.

Spirit AeroSystems builds the 777′s forward fuselage in Wichita.

The 777X is an upgraded version of the 777.

The first 777X delivery is expected in 2020.

Boeing has 300 orders and commitments for the model from six customers.

 

So far, all is quiet at Spirit AeroSystems

Despite lots of rumors and anxiety, it appears all is quiet at Spirit AeroSystems, the day rumored to be a day of a big announcement.

“We don’t comment about rumors, and have no announcements to make at this time,” Ken Evans, Spirit spokesman, said this morning.

In June, Todd Tiahrt, who is running for the 4th Congressional District seat, said sources told him that Spirit appears to be exploring the sale of its metal fabrication work to an outside company.

Tiahrt has been getting calls from concerned employees, he said, including some who told him they had attended meetings about the issue.

Last month, the Society of Professional Engineering Employees in Aerospace asked Spirit to respond to a list of rumors that have been circulating about the possible sale of detail parts fabrication and non-Boeing-related assembly work and about rumors that Boeing was taking back some of its work at the site.

Spirit has steadfastly said it doesn’t comment on rumors.

At the same time, Spirit has its Oklahoma facilities up for sale.

The company has received a lot of interest in those facilities.

So any announcement could involve the Tulsa site, SPEEA Midwest director Bob Brewer has said.

Brewer said Wednesday morning that the union hasn’t heard a thing about any announcements today.

“We’re just talking business here today,” Brewer said. “If something happens, something happens.”

He’s staying tuned.

“It may not be today,” Brewer said. “It could be tomorrow. It could be next week. We don’t know.”

 

Read more here: http://www.kansas.com/2014/06/17/3512808/unions-ask-spirit-to-address-work.html#storylink=cpy

Galaxy Technologies, Kansas Aviation win state’s top business honors

Galaxy Technologies in Winfield was honored with the Governor’s Award of Excellence and Kansas Aviation of Independence received the Governor’s Exporter of the Year Award at a banquet on Tuesday.

The awards are the state’s top business honors.

They were awarded as part of Business Appreciation Month, the Kansas Department of Commerce’s annual tribute to Kansas businesses for their contributions to the state.

Galaxy Technologies, founded in 1985 as Galaxy Tool,  is a specialized blow molding manufacturing company in Winfield. It employs 210 people.

Kansas Aviation of Independence specializes in the repair and overhaul of engine accessories on business fixed wing and rotor aircraft. It installs parts on more than 12,000 aircraft engines a year. It employs 81 people.

Finalists for the Governor’s Award of Excellence include Benefit Management in Great Bend, Grandstand Glassware & Apparel in Lawrence, Geary Community Hospital in Junction City and LifeTeam in Newton.

Finalists for the Governor’s Exporter of the Year Award were Balco Inc., in Wichita, GT Manufacturing in Clay Center, Mid-Continent Instruments and Avionics in Wichita and Swift Bullet Co. in Quinter.

 

 

Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner earns government certifications

Boeing‘s 787-9 Dreamliner has been certified for commercial service by the Federal Aviation Administration and the European Aviation Safety Agency.

Boeing is in the final stages of preparing for the first 787-9 delivery to its launch customer Air New Zealand.

The 787-9 is a stretched version of the 787-8 now in service. Its fuselage is 20 feet longer over the 787-8 and will fly more passengers and more cargo farther distances, the company said.

Spirit AeroSystems in Wichita builds the plane’s nose section.

Boeing has taken 413 orders for the 787-9 from 26 customers. That accounts for 40 percent of all 787 orders, the company said.

“Certification is the culmination of years of hard work and a rigorous flight-test program that started with the 787-9′s first flight in September,” Ray Conner, Boeing Commercial Airplanes president and CEO, said in a statement. “With this validation that the airplane is ready for commercial operations, Boeing along with our airline and leasing customers now look forward to introducing the newest member of the Dreamliner family to passengers around the world.”

The FAA has also granted Boeing an Amended Production Certificate, which validates that Boeing’s production system can produce 787-9s that conform to the design.

The certifications follow a comprehensive test program using five airplanes accumulating more than 1,500 hours of flight testing, plus ground and laboratory testing.

 

 

Cessna’s Citation Sovereign+ receives European certification

Cessna Aircraft has announced that its Citation Sovereign+ business jet has received European Aviation Safety Agency certification, Europe’s equivalent of the Federal Aviation Administration.

“We have a number of European customers ready to take delivery of their aircraft, and with EASA certification we can now get the Sovereign+ into the marketplace, ” Chris Henne, Cessna’s vice president of jets, said in a statement.

The Sovereign+ is an upgraded Sovereign, with a new cockpit, winglets, enhanced climb performance and range and Garmin G5000 avionics.

It has a range of 3,188 nautical miles and a top speed of 529 mph.

The plane recently completed a demonstration tour in Europe, where it debuted at the European Business Aviation Convention & Exhibition in Geneva, Switzerland.

 

NetJets a step closer to providing service in China

NetJets Business Aviation Limited, called NetJets China, is moving closer to providing charter service and aircraft management in China.

The company, a joint venture among U.S.-based NetJets and a consortium of Chinese investors, said it has obtained an operating permit from the Civil Aviation Administration of China.

The approval moves NetJet China closer to the final step of certification of its operating certificate.

Then, NetJets China will be able to begin providing private jet services in China.

The company hopes to receive its operating certificate over the next few months.

In the meantime, NetJets China has been preparing for the start of flight operations, it said.

It’s hired staff, established the needed internal structures and process for flight operations and has begun forming relationships with key vendors, the company said.

It’s also bought and imported two planes into China — Wichita-built Hawker 800s — to offer charter services as soon as it gets approval.

The business is a joint venture among NetJets; Hony Jinsi Investment Management, a Chinese private equity firm; and Fung Investments, a private investment company.

Operations are based in the Zhuhai Jinwan Airport.

 

 

Analyst: Spirit AeroSystems outsourcing of fab work would make sense; Tulsa sale a ‘wild card’

It would make sense for Spirit AeroSystems to outsource its fabrication operation, Cowen and Co. analyst Cai von Rumohr wrote in a note to investors.

A story in The Eagle last week said Spirit appears to be exploring that option.

“It would make sense to outsource fab work to a major Tier 2 build-to-print supplier, like PCP (Precision Castparts), which offers lower costs in return for higher market share,” von Rumohr wrote.

Cost savings could include more efficient machining utilization rates and lower material costs, such as internally sourced titanium, he wrote.

“Thus, while it’s impossible to size a potential outsourcing deal, it likely would be a win-win-win,” von Rumohr wrote.

In addition, Spirit’s recent update of its master contract with Boeing reduces risk for Spirit, he said.

Spirit and Boeing announced the master contract in April.

The pricing covers the Boeing 737, 747, 767 and 777 programs through Dec. 31, 2015.

The contract allows for price increases if production rates dip and for continued 737 and 777 profitability, he said. It also avoids locking Spirit into a risky long-term fixed price agreement.

In the meantime, a possible sale of Spirit’s Tulsa operation is still a “wild card,” von Rumohr wrote.

Spirit has been exploring a sale of that operation.

“We retain our ‘show me’ attitude toward (Spirit’s) possible sale of its Tulsa wing business,” he said.

That’s because Boeing and Gulfstream programs, which it has there, may attract two different buyers, von Rumohr wrote.

In addition, the work is done in one location, and any sale will require new contracts with Boeing and Gulstream. who might require price concessions in return for the agreement, von Rumohr wrote.

The sale of the Tulsa facility or a major fabrication outsourcing deal, however, would bolster investor confidence in Spirit’s cash flow outlook, he said.

Boeing delivers fourth P-8I aircraft to Indian Navy

Boeing has delivered the fourth P-8I maritime patrol aircraft to India, which fulfills the first half of a contract for eight planes, the company said.

The shipment was made on schedule, it said,

Spirit AeroSystems in Wichita builds major portions of the plane, including the fuselage.

The P-8I is the Indian Navy variant of the P-8a Poseidon that Boeing has developed for the U.S. Navy.

The aircraft is based on Boeing’s 737 commercial jetliner.

“The Indian Navy is putting the first three P-8Is through their paces operationally, and the P-8I delivered today (Friday) will begin flight trials in the coming months,” Leland Wright, Boeing P-8I program manager, said in a statement.

Yingling Aviation donates simulator to K-State Salina

Yingling Aviation has donated a flight simulator to Kansas State University’s flight program in Salina, the two organizations said.

The simulator is designed to simulate a Cessna 172 with Garmin G1000 avionics and a GFC700 autopilot.

Yingling had been using the simulator for the past six years for its flight training program.

It’s since discontinued flight instruction.

Donating the simulator to K-State was an easy choice, Lonnie Vaughan, Yingling president, said.

“We decided to find it a home where it can be put to valuable use, and K-State Salina obviously fits that bill,” Vaughan said.

The school is waiting for Federal Aviation Administration approval to incorporate the simulator formally into its pilot training curriculum.

Wichita Manufacturers Association announces scholarship winners

The Wichita Manufacturers Association awarded 19 scholarships for 2014.

Sixteen companies that are members of the association provided funds for a named scholarship, two scholarships were provided by the association’s scholarship fund, comprised of member donations. And one scholarship is funded by the Wichita Area Technical College.

The winners are Jacob Dold, Bao Pham, Austin Towne, Brianne McNutt, Tanner Harpool, Jose Cisneros, Taylor Price, Arlene Raymundo, Nathan Ruzzin, Michelle Wheeler, Katherine Marceau, Henry Ramirez, Kyle Offutt, Phillip Osu, Talon Wanless, Conner Garoung, Maggie Koops, Colin Phillips and Ryan Wolfe.

They won $1,000 scholarships.

Wichita Manufacturers Association has more than 150 members, made up of managers and owners of manufacturing companies in Wichita and Sedgwick County.

The objective is to promote the general welfare of manufacturers, to educate the public about manufacturing companies and their products, to acquaint members with one another and their products and operations, to attract, advise and assist other manufacturers who may want to locate in the Wichita area, and to support educational opportunities and activities that promote and develop better manufacturing interests, methods and employees.