Daily Archives: Feb. 26, 2014

Boeing’s P-8A Poseidon to enter full production with $2.4 billion contract for 16 planes

The Navy has ordered its first production lot of P-8A Poseidon aircraft from Boeing in a $2.4 billion contract, Boeing said Tuesday.

The order for 18 additional aircraft means the program will enter full production.

The order takes the total fleet to 53 and marks the transition from preliminary to low-rate production of the P-8A, which will bolster maritime patrol capabilities, the company said.

Spirit AeroSystems in Wichita builds the fuselgae for the P-8A, which is based on a 737-800 commercial aircraft.

So far, Boeing has delivered 13 P-8As to the Navy, which deployed its first patrol squadron to Kadena, Japan, in December.

“This milestone is a testament to the incredible effort and dedication of the team to deliver the P-8A to the fleet as planned,” Navy P-8A program manager Capt. Scott Dillon said in a statement. “The future of the Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance community has begun to make history with the P-8As already delivered to the fleet. These full-rate production aircraft will give us the opportunity to deliver the best system through a cost-effective procurement contract.”

The P-8A will enhance the service’s anti-submarine, anti-surface warfare and intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance capabilities, Boeing said.

The Navy plans to buy a total of 117 P-8As to replace its P-3 fleet.

Boeing’s P-8 team includes CFM International, Northrop Grumman, Raytheon, Spirit AeroSystems, BAE Systems and GE Aviation.

Cessna: Citation Latitude makes third flight, achieves maximum performance envelope

Cessna Aircraft’s Citation Latitude prototype has made its third test flight.

During the flight, the business jet successfully achieved its full envelope of performance, the company said.

It reached a maximum speed of 506 mph and an altitude of 45,000 feet with a gross takeoff weight of 29,000 pounds.

The plane made its maiden flight last week.

Michael Thacker, Cessna senior vice president of engineering, said in a statement that from an engineering perspective, Cessna’s team has designed a plane that is proceeding in a predictable, reliable manner.

The test plane is displaying characteristics of a mature system in its first few flights.

Cessna CEO Scott Ernest called the Latitude a breakthrough aircraft in many ways.

The plane is an affirmation of Cessna’s commitment to new product development, Ernest said

“The Latitude is an aircraft that delivers a lot of firsts from Cessna — the wide fuselage, the stand-up cabin with a flat floor, auto-throttles, the electric door and the improved cabin environment,” Ernest said. “All these achievements stem from listening to the voice of the customer and getting down to the business of delivering what customers need and desire.”